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Associate in Applied Science Degree Programs – Computer Information Systems and Multimedia Programs

INFORMATIONApplication Development

(An Approved Tech-Prep Program)
This program provides the knowledge and training needed for employment or advancement in the field of computer information systems in several positions such as applications developer, programmer/analyst trainee, computer operator, and database administrator. The curriculum emphasizes business applications and focuses on an in-depth knowledge of data processing with an understanding of the business environment. This program offers both a two-year A.A.S. degree and a one-year certificate in Application Development.

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
COSC 1301 Microcomputer Applications 3 hrs
COSC 1336 Programming Fundamentals I 3 hrs
ITNW 1337 Introduction to the Internet 1 3 hrs
ITSC 1305 Introduction to PC Operating Systems 3 hrs
ITSW 1307 Introduction to Database 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
COSC 1337 Programming Fundamentals II 3 hrs
ITSE 1331 Introduction to Visual BASIC Programming 1 3 hrs
ITNW 1320 NetWare Administration 2 or
ITNW 1354 Implementing & Supporting Servers 3 or
ITCC 1310 Cisco Discovery I: Networking for Home and Small Businesses 4
3 hrs
ACNT 1303 Introduction to Accounting I 1 or
ACCT 2401 Principles of Financial Accounting
3 hrs
  12 hrs
Summer  
Social and Behavioral Sciences elective (ECON recommended) 6 3 hrs
Math (college-level) or Natural Sciences elective 6 3 hrs
Speech Communications 6 3 hrs
  9 hrs
Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
COSC 2336 Programming Fundamentals III 3 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition 6 3 hrs
ITSE 1311 Beginning Web Programming 3 hrs
ITSE 2309 Introduction to Database Programming 3 hrs
Humanities or Visual/Performing Arts elective 6 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
COSC 2325 Computer Organization & Machine Language or
ITSW 2337 Advanced Database
3 hrs
ITSE 1350 System Analysis and Design 5 or
ITSE 2339 Personal Computer Help Desk 5 or Computer Internship 5
3-4 hrs
ITSE 2302 Intermediate Web Page Programming 3 hrs
ITSY 1342 Information Technology Security 3 hrs
  12-13 hrs
Total 63-64 hrs

1 This course may be eligible for articulation with some high schools. Check with your high school counselor for more information.
2 MCC is a Novell Education Academic Partner. This course is certified by Novell Inc. and covers competencies included on the CNA (Certified NetWare Administrator) exam.
3 This course is designed to prepare students for the exams to receive the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) and Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) certification.
4 MCC is a CISCO Local Academy. This is one of four courses leading up to the CISCO Certified Network Administrator certification.
5 This course is a Capstone course, which brings together knowledge and skills learned in other courses and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks. Check course prerequisites.
6 See General Education Requirements.

INFORMATIONInformation Systems & Applications

(An Approved Tech-Prep Program)
This program provides the knowledge and training needed for employment or advancement in business as an information systems specialist. Graduates with this degree will be prepared to serve in several positions such as help desk technicians, technical support, software and hardware installers, business systems analysts and system trainers. This program offers a two-year A.A.S. degree and a one-year certificate.

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
COSC 1301 Microcomputer Applications 3 hrs
COSC 1336 Programming Fundamentals I 3 hrs
ITNW 1337 Introduction to the Internet 1 3 hrs
ITSC 1305 Introduction to PC Operating Systems 3 hrs
ITSW 1304 Introduction to Spreadsheets 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
ARTC 1302 Digital Imaging I 1 3 hrs
Math (college-level) or Natural Sciences elective 7 3 hrs
ITSE 1331 Introduction to Visual BASIC Programming 1
or ITSE 1311 Beginning Web Programming
3 hrs
ITSW 1301 Word Processing 1, 2 3 hrs
ITSW 1307 Introduction to Database 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Summer  
Social and Behavioral Sciences elective
(ECON recommended) 7
3 hrs
Speech Communication 7 3 hrs
  6 hrs
Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
ACNT 1303 Introduction to Accounting I 1 or
ACCT 2401 Principles of Financial Accounting
3-4 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I 7 3 hrs
IMED 1316 Web Design I 1 3 hrs
ITSC 1325 Personal Computer Hardware 1 3 hrs
ITSC 2339 Personal Computer Help Desk 6 3 hrs
  15-16 hrs
Second Semester  
ARTC 1313 Digital Publishing I 1 3 hrs
Computer elective (higher level course) 8 3 hrs
Humanities or Visual/Performing Arts elective 7 3 hrs
ITNW 1320 NetWare Administration 3 or
ITNW 1354 Implementing and Supporting Servers 4 or
ITCC 1310 Cisco Discovery I: Networking
for Home and Small Businesses 5
3 hrs
ITSE 1350 Systems Analysis and Design 6 or Computer Internship 6 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Total 66-67 hrs

1 This course may be eligible for articulation with some high schools. Please check with your high school counselor for more information.
2 Keyboarding and mouse skills recommended or enroll in POFT 1227. Students must type 30 words a minute.
3 MCC is a Novell Education Academic Partner. This course is certified by Novell Inc. and covers competencies included on the CNA (Certified NetWare Administrator) exam.
4 This course is designed to prepare students for the exams to receive the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) and Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) certification.
5 MCC is a Cisco Local Academy. This is one of four courses leading up to the Cisco Certified Network Administrator Certification.
6 This course is a Capstone course, which brings together knowledge and skills learned in other courses and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks. Check course prerequisites.
7 See General Education Requirements.
8 Computer electives: Students may choose from the following advanced courses or get advisor consent:
IMED 2315 Web Design II
ITSE 2302 Intermediate Web Programming
ITSE 2349 Advanced Visual Basic
ITSE 2309 Database Programming
ITSW 2337 Advanced Database
ITSY 1342 Information Technology Security
ITSE 1311 Beginning Web Programming

INFORMATIONNetwork Administration

(An Approved Tech-Prep Program)
Today’s computer power comes from networking an array of computers and computerized devices. The Network Administration A.A.S. degree and certificates were created to meet the demand for network specialists.

MCC courses prepare students to take the Microsoft Certification Professional and Microsoft Certified System Administrator (MCSA) exams. MCC is a Microsoft Academic Alliance partner.

MCC is also a CISCO Local Academy. There is a four-course sequence that covers the competencies on the CISCO Certified Network Administrator (CCNA) exam.

MCC is a Novell Education Academic Partner, and three semester hours of MCC’s networking courses are certified by Novell Inc. These courses are structured to cover the competencies on the Certified NetWare Administrator (CNA) exam.

This program offers both a two-year A.A.S. degree in Network Administration with coverage of networking technologies, including Microsoft, CISCO systems, LINUX and Novell, as well as three one-year specialty certificates (Microsoft, Cisco, and Novell).

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
COSC 1301 Microcomputer Applications 3 hrs
COSC 1336 Programming Fundamentals I 3 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I 6 3 hrs
ITSC 1305 Introduction to PC Operating Systems 3 hrs
ITCC 1310 Cisco Discovery I: Networking for
Home and Small Businesses 4
3 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
ITCC 1311 Cisco Discovery II: Working at a
Small-to-Medium Business or ISP 4
3 hrs
ITNW 1354 Implementing and Supporting Servers 3 3 hrs
ITSY 1342 Information Technology Security 3 hrs
ITSC 1325 Personal Computer Hardware 1 3 hrs
Math (college-level) or Natural Sciences elective 6 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Summer  
Social and Behavioral Sciences (ECON recommended) 6 3 hrs
ITCC 1312 Cisco Discovery III: Introducing Routing and
Switching in the Enterprise 4
3 hrs
ITCC 1313 Discovery: Designing and Supporting
Computer Networks 4
3 hrs
  9 hrs
Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
Speech Communication elective (SPCH 1321 recommended) 6 3 hrs
ITNW 1320 NetWare Administration 2 3 hrs
ITSC 1307 Unix Operating System I 3 hrs
ITSC 2339 Personal Computer Help Desk 5 or ITSE 1350 Systems Analysis and Design 5 or Computer Internship 5 3-4 hrs
Humanities or Visual/Performing Arts elective 6 3 hrs
  15-16 hrs
Second Semester  
ITNW 2352 Administering a Microsoft SQL Server 3 3 hrs
ITNW 1345 Implementing Network Directory Services 3 3 hrs
ITSC 1347 UNIX System Administration II (Server) 3 hrs
ITSY 2301 Firewall and Network Security 3 hrs
  12 hrs
Total 66-67 hrs

1 This course may be eligible for articulation with some high schools. Please check with your high school counselor for more information.
2 MCC is a Novell Education Academic Partner. This course is certified by Novell Inc. and covers competencies included on the CNA (Certified NetWare Administrator) exam.
3 This course is designed to prepare students for the exams to receive the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) and Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) certification.
4MCC is a CISCO Local Academy. This is one of four courses leading up to the CISCO Certified Network Administrator certification.
5 This course is a Capstone course, which brings together knowledge and skills learned in other courses and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks. Check course prerequisites.
6 See General Education Requirements.

ARTS-AV-TECHMedia Communications

This program prepares students for the diverse and exciting world of digital media manipulation and production. Curriculum exposes students to various types of digital media including digital imaging and graphics, audio and video production, 2D and 3D animation, Web technologies, and desktop publishing. This program consists of a two-year A.A.S. in Media Communications as well as certificates in Web design, Internet Web mastery, and Media Communications. It prepares students for careers in graphic design, Web site production and management, video production, animation, gaming, electronic journalism, communications, etc. The A.A.S. has two tracks, one that focuses on design concepts and the second that specializes in the technical aspect of running a media server. The program is a joint venture with Texas State Technical College (TSTC). Students can take courses at both MCC and TSTC to complete the course requirements.

Media Communications – Tech Track

(An Approved Tech-Prep Program)

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
COSC 1301 Microcomputer Applications 3 hrs
ARTC 1302 Digital Imaging I 1 3 hrs
ARTV 2301 Animation 2D 3 hrs
ARTS 1311 Design I 8 3 hrs
IMED 1316 Web Design I 1 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
*ARTV 1351 Digital Video 1 (can be taken at MCC or TSTC) 3 hrs
IMED 2315 Web Design II 3 hrs
COSC 1336 Programming Fundamentals I 3 hrs
ITSW 1307 Introduction to Database 3 hrs
COMM 1307 Introduction to Mass Communications 8 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Summer  
Social & Behavioral Sciences elective (ECON recommended) 8 3 hrs
Math (college-level) or Natural Sciences elective 8 3 hrs
Speech Communications 8 3 hrs
  9 hrs
Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
ITSE 1331 Introduction to Visual BASIC 1 or
ITSE 1311 Beginning Web Programming
3 hrs
Business elective 5 3 hrs
ITSC 1305 Introduction to PC Operating Systems 3 hrs
ITSC 1325 Personal Computer Hardware 1 3 hrs
ITNW 1354 Implementing & Supporting Servers 4 or
ITNW 1320 NetWare 3 or
ITCC 1310 Cisco Discovery I: Networking for Home and Small Businesses 2
3 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
ITSY 1342 Information Technology or CIS Media elective 6 3 hrs
IMED 2309 Internet Commerce 3 hrs
IMED 2313 Project Analysis & Design or Internship 7 3 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I 3 hrs
  12 hrs
  Total 66 hrs

Media Communications – Media Track

(An Approved Tech-Prep Program)

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
COSC 1301 Microcomputer Applications 3 hrs
ARTC 1302 Digital Imaging I 1 3 hrs
ARTV 2301 Animation 2D 3 hrs
ARTS 1311 Design I 8 3 hrs
IMED 1316 Web Design I 1 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
*ARTV 1351 Digital Video 1 (can be taken at MCC or TSTC) 3 hrs
IMED 2315 Web Design II 3 hrs
COSC 1336 Programming Fundamentals I 3 hrs
ITSW 1307 Introduction to Database 3 hrs
COMM 1307 Introduction to Mass Communications 8 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Summer  
Social & Behavioral Sciences elective (ECON recommended) 8 3 hrs
Math (college-level) or Natural Sciences elective 8 3 hrs
Speech Communications 8 3 hrs
  9 hrs
Sophomore Year  
First Semester 3 hrs
ITSE 1311 Beginning Web Programming 3 hrs
Business elective 5 3 hrs
*ARTV 1345 3D Animation 3 hrs
*GRPH 1359 Object Oriented Computer Graphics 3 hrs
ARTC 1313 Digital Publishing I 1 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
CIS Media elective 6 3 hrs
IMED 2309 Internet Commerce 3 hrs
IMED 2313 Project Analysis & Design or Internship 7 3 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I 3 hrs
  12 hrs
  Total 66 hrs

* Offered at TSTC
1 This course may be eligible for articulation with some high schools. Check with your high school counselor for more information.
2 MCC is a CISCO Local Academy. This is one of four courses leading up to the CISCO Certified Network Administrator certification.
3 MCC is a Novell Education Academic Partner. This course is certified by Novell Inc. and covers competencies included on the CNA (Certified NetWare Administrator) exam.
4 This course is designed to prepare students for the exams to receive the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) and Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) certification.
5 Business electives: Students may choose from the following advanced courses or get advisor consent:
BMGT 1307 High Performance Teams
BUSI 1301 Survey of Business
BUSG 2309 Small Business Management
MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing
6 CIS Media electives: Students may choose from the following advanced courses or get advisor consent:
*IMED 2311 Portfolio Development
*IMED 2305 Multimedia Authoring II
ARTS 2313 Design Communication or *ARTC 1305 Basic Graphic Design
ARTC 2313 Digital Publishing
7 This course is a Capstone course, which brings together knowledge and skills learned in other courses and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks. This Capstone course should be taken in the student’s fall or spring last semester before graduation.
8 See General Education Requirements.

Marketable Skills Award in Business

Required Courses  
ACNT 1303 Introduction to Accounting 3 hrs
BMGT 1327 Principles of Management 3 hrs
MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing 3 hrs
BUSI 2301 Business Law or BMGT 2309 Leadership 3 hrs
  Total 12 hrs

In order to receive a Marketable Skills Award, the following requirements must be met:
1. You must make a minimum grade of C in each course.
2. You must provide an unofficial transcript, with the appropriate courses
highlighted on the request form.
3. You must submit a Request for Processing form to AS 218 for processing.

Your Marketable Skills Award certificate will include your course grade and the job competencies in the courses taken.

Associate in Applied Science Degree Programs – Business Programs

Accounting

This program prepares students for positions in the accounting departments of large and small private businesses and service agencies such as hospitals and federal, state, and local governments. Jobs range from specific areas such as payroll accounting to handling an entire accounting system. The emphasis is on concepts, with practical application on the job and an understanding of the business and economic environment. Graduates are qualified to fill jobs in a variety of interesting and challenging organizations.

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
ACNT 1303 Introduction to Accounting I 2 3 hrs
BUSI 1301 Survey of Business 3 hrs
BMGT 1327 Principles of Management 3 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I or
POFT 1301 Business English
3 hrs
POFT 1227 Introduction To Keyboarding 1, 2 2 hrs
MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing 3 hrs
  17 hrs
Second Semester  
BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications 4 3 hrs
Humanities or Visual/Performing Arts elective 6 3 hrs
ACCT 2401 Principles of Financial Accounting 4 hrs
Math (college-level) or both POFT 1321 Business Math and Natural Sciences elective 4 3/6 hrs
Speech Communication 3 hrs
  16-19 hrs

Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
ACNT 1329 Payroll and Business Tax Accounting 3 hrs
ITSW 1304 Introduction to Spreadsheets 3 hrs
ACCT 2402 Principles of Managerial Accounting 4 hrs
BUSI 1307 Personal Finance 3 hrs
ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 hrs
  16 hrs
Second Semester  
ACNT 1313 Computerized Accounting Applications 7 3 hrs
ACNT 2488 Internship – Accounting or
Business elective 5
3-4 hrs
BUSI 2301 Business Law I 3 hrs
ECON 2302 Principles of Microeconomics 3 hrs
BMGT 1341 Business Ethics 3 hrs
  15-16 hrs
Total 64-68 hrs

1 May be waived if student has taken a keyboarding course (touch method) or if the student can type by touch at least 30 words a minute. Keyboarding test is required.
2 May be eligible for articulation through high school Tech-Prep or by individual courses from high school. See your high school counselor for information. A business elective may be substituted for ACNT 1303 if the student has one year of high school accounting or accounting/bookkeeping experience. See footnote 5.
3 Recommended for students transferring to a four-year institution.
4 May be articulated but will be substituted as ITSC 1309 (may not transfer to four-year institutions).
5 Business electives are accounting (ACCT and ACNT), business (BMGT, BUSI, HRPO, IBUS and MRKG), computer information systems (BCIS, CISY, COSC, ITNW, ITSC, ITSE, and ITSW), economics (ECON), office technology (POFL, POFM, POFT), and real estate (RELE). Students must meet prerequisite requirements of the business elective they choose.
6 See General Education Requirements for list of humanities courses.
7 This is a Capstone course, which brings together skills and knowledge learned in other classes and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks.

Business Management

The purpose of this program is to help students prepare to enter or advance in a management career or to open a business of their own. It is designed for those with minimum management experience, those in managerial positions who need to update and upgrade their skills and performance, and those owning or seeking to own their own business. Work experience and on-the-job training are integral parts of this program. Course requirements focus on skills necessary for successful performance as a manager or small business owner.

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing 3 hrs
BUSI 1301 Survey of Business 3 hrs
BMGT 1327 Principles of Management 3 hrs
BMGT 2488 Internship I – Business Administration and Management 5 4 hrs
POFT 1227 Introduction To Keyboarding 1, 2 2 hrs
  15 hrs
Second Semester  
BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications 3, 4 3 hrs
HRPO 2301 Human Resource Management 3 hrs
BUSI 2301 Business Law I 3 hrs
BMGT 2489 Internship II -Business Administration and Management 5 4 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I or
POFT 1301 Business English
3 hrs
  16 hrs

Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
BMGT 2309 Leadership 3 hrs
BMGT 1307 High Performance Work Teams 3 hrs
Humanities or Visual/Performing Arts elective 7 3 hrs
ACNT 1303 Introduction to Accounting 7 3 hrs
BMGT 2470 Internship III – Business Administration and Management 5, 6 Capstone 4 hrs
  16 hrs
Second Semester  
Math (college-level) 4 or both POFT 1321 Business Math
and Natural Sciences elective 7
3-6 hrs
ECON 1301 Introduction to Economics or
ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics or
ECON 2302 Principles of Microeconomics
3 hrs
General Education elective 7 3 hrs
Speech elective 3 hrs
BUSG 2309 Small Business Management or
Elective (college-level) 7
3 hrs
  15-18 hrs
Total 62-65 hrs

1 May be waived if student has taken a keyboarding course (touch method) or if the student can type by touch at least 30 words a minute. Keyboarding test is required.
2 Prerequisite is ACNT 1303 Intro to Accounting I.
3 May be eligible for articulation through high school Tech-Prep or by individual courses from high school. See your high school counselor for information. A business elective may be substituted for ACNT 1303 if the student has one year of high school accounting/bookkeeping experience.
4 Recommended for students transferring to a four-year institution.
5 May be articulated but will be substituted as ITSC 1309 (may not transfer to four-year institutions).
6 Business electives are accounting (ACCT and ACNT), business (BMGT, HAMG, HPRO, IBUS and MRKG), computer information systems (ITCC, COSC, ITNW, ITSC, ITSE and ITSW), economics (ECON), office technology (POFI, POFM, POFT, and POFL), commercial music (MUSP, MUSB), and real estate (RELE). Students must meet prerequisite requirements of the business elective they choose.
7 This is a Capstone course, which brings together skills and knowledge learned in other classes and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks.

General Business

This program provides an opportunity for students to study the fundamentals of business operations. The emphasis is on both the practical functions as well as the theoretical aspects of business organizations. For the student undecided on a specific career, the General Business Program is also an excellent means of exploring the many careers associated with a business. Jobs available to graduates may include management, marketing/sales occupations, and other business-related fields.

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
BUSI 1301 Survey of Business 3 hrs
BMGT 1327 Principles of Management 3 hrs
ACNT 1303 Introduction to Accounting I 2 3 hrs
MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing 3 hrs
POFT 1227 Introduction Keyboarding I 1, 2 2 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I or
POFT 1301 Business English
3 hrs
  17 hrs
Second Semester  
BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications 3, 4 3 hrs
BUSI 2301 Business Law I 3 hrs
ACCT 2401 Principles of Financial Accounting 4 hrs
Humanities or Visual/Performing Arts elective 5 3 hrs
Supervision or Elective (college-level) 3 hrs
  16 hrs
Summer Between Years 1 and 2  
Elective (college-level) 3 hrs
  3 hrs

Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
MRKG 2349 Advertising and Sales Promotion or
MRKG 2333 Principles of Selling
3 hrs
ACCT 2402 Principles of Managerial Accounting 4 hrs
HRPO 2301 Human Resource Management 3 hrs
BMGT 1307 High Performance Work Teams or BUSI 1307 Personal Finance 3 hrs
ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 hrs
  16 hrs
Second Semester  
Math (college-level) or both POFT 1321 Business Math
and Science elective 5
3 hrs
ECON 2302 Microeconomics 3 hrs
Speech Elective 5 3 hrs
Electives (college-level) 3 hrs
BMGT 2309 Leadership 6 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Total 67 hrs

1 May be waived if student has taken a keyboarding course (touch method) or if the student can type by touch at least 30 words a minute. Keyboarding test is required.
2 May be eligible for articulation through high school Tech-Prep or by individual courses from high school. See your high school counselor for information. A business elective may be substituted for ACNT 1303 if the student has one year of high school accounting/bookkeeping or accounting experience.
3 Recommended for students transferring to a four-year institution.
4 May be articulated but will be substituted as ITSC 1309 (may not transfer to a four-year institution).
5 See General Education Requirements.
6 This is a Capstone course, which brings together skills and knowledge learned in other classes and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks.

Marketing

This program expands your career opportunities in the exciting and dynamic field of marketing. Emphasis is on developing skills in marketing strategy, advertising, salesmanship, and retailing management. On-the-job training internships supplement the classroom experience.

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
BUSI 1301 Survey of Business 3 hrs
BMGT 1327 Principles of Management 3 hrs
MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing 3 hrs
ACNT 1303 Introduction to Accounting I 2 3 hrs
POFT 1227 Introduction to Keyboarding 1, 2 2 hrs
Speech elective 7 3 hrs
  17 hrs
Second Semester  
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I or
POFT 1301 Business English
3 hrs
BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications 3, 4 or
COSC 1301 Microcomputer Applications 4
3 hrs
MRKG 1302 Principles of Retailing 3 hrs
MRKG 2333 Principles of Selling 3 hrs
BUSI 2301 Business Law I 3 hrs
  15 hrs

Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
PHIL 2306 Ethics 3 hrs
MRKG 2349 Advertising and Sales Promotion 3 hrs
MRKG 2488 Internship – Business Marketing and Marketing Management 6,8 4 hrs
ENGL 2311 Technical Communication 3 hrs
Math elective (college-level) 4 or both POFT 1321 Business Math and Natural Sciences elective 7 3 hrs
  16 hrs
Second Semester  
ECON 1301 Introduction to Economics or
ECON 2301 Macroeconomics or
ECON 2302 Microeconomics
3 hrs
IBUS 1305 Introduction to International Business and Trade 3 hrs
MRKG 2489 Internship II – Business Marketing and
Marketing Management 5, 6, 9
4 hrs
IMED 2309 Internet Commerce 3 hrs
ARTC 1302 Digital Imaging I 3 hrs
  16 hrs
Total 62-64 hrs

1 May be waived if the student has taken a keyboarding course (touch method) or if the student can type by touch at least 30 words a minute. Keyboarding test is required.
2 May be eligible for articulation through high school Tech-Prep or by individual courses from high school. See your high school counselor for information. A business elective may be substituted for ACNT 1303 if the student has one year of high school accounting/bookkeeping experience.
3 Recommended for students transferring to a four-year institution.
4 May be articulated but will be substituted as ITSC 1309 (may not transfer to a four-year institution).
5 This is a Capstone course, which brings together skills and knowledge learned in other classes and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks. Must be a marketing major.
6 Students must meet Guidelines for Internships and have approval of the program director before enrolling in an internship.
7 See General Education Requirements.
8 Prerequisite: MRKG 1311
9 Prerequisite: MRKG 2333 or MRKG 2349 or MRKG 1302

Real Estate

This management program specialty area meets the academic requirements for both salesman and broker real estate licensure. The curriculum prepares the graduate to participate in the real estate industry as a broker, salesman, investor or manager. The courses provide knowledge and skills required in the real estate services of brokerage, development, property management, appraisal and financing.

Freshman Year  
First Semester  
RELE 1301 Principles of Real Estate I 3 hrs
RELE 2301 Law of Agency 3 hrs
BUSI 1301 Survey of Business 3 hrs
POFT 1227 Introduction to Keyboarding 1, 2 2 hrs
POFT 1301 Business English 3 hrs
BMGT 1327 Principles of Management 3 hrs
  17 hrs
Second Semester  
RELE 1311 Real Estate Contract 3 hrs
RELE 1338 Principles of Real Estate II 3 hrs
MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing 3 hrs
RELE 1325 Real Estate Mathematics 3 hrs
COSC 1301 Microcomputer Applications 2 or BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications 2 3 hrs
  15 hrs

Sophomore Year  
First Semester  
ACNT 1303 Introduction to Accounting I 2 or
ACCT 2401 Principles of Financial Accounting
3-4 hrs
ENGL 2311 Technical Communication 3 hrs
Real Estate elective 3 3 hrs
PHIL 2374 Critical Thinking 3 hrs
Math (college-level) 3 or both POFT 1321 Business Math
and Natural Sciences elective 4
3 hrs
  15-16 hrs
Second Semester  
ECON 1301 Introduction to Economics or
ECON 2301 Macroeconomics or ECON 2302 Microeconomics
3 hrs
RELE 2589 Internship – Real Estate 5 5 hrs
BMGT 1344 Negotiations and Conflict Management 3 hrs
Speech elective 4 3 hrs
RELE 2331 Real Estate Brokerage 3 hrs
  17 hrs
Total 64-65 hrs

1 May be waived if the student has taken a keyboarding course (touch method) or if the student can type at least 30 words a minute. Keyboarding test is required.
2 May be eligible for articulation through high school Tech-Prep or by individual courses from high school. See your high school counselor for information. A business elective may be substituted for ACNT 1303 if the student has one year of high school accounting/bookkeeping experience.
3 Real Estate electives are RELE 1303, 1307, 1309, 1311, 1315, 1319, 1321, 1325, 1327, 1331, 2103, 2589, 2331.
4 See General Education Requirements.
5 This is a Capstone course, which brings together skills and knowledge learned in other classes and applies them in decision-making situations and in completing job tasks. Must be Real Estate major.

Workforce Education Programs (A.A.S. & Certificate)

fire-academyMcLennan Community College offers course work designed to prepare students to enter specific occupational areas at the end of a one- or two-year period of specialized training or to continue their education at a four-year institution. Suggested courses of study for each of these options are included in this chapter, which focuses on workforce programs that lead to a certificate or an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree. Each student should, however, see a faculty advisor or program director at the earliest opportunity in order to effectively plan his or her program.

General Education Requirements

Each A.A.S. degree program has at least 15 semester hours of general education with credit hours from each of the following three areas: humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, and math/science/computer science. These courses are indicated in bold typeface.

Requirements for the Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree

  1. Credit for a minimum of 60 semester hours of college work excluding developmental courses. Such credit will include:

    1. Completion of the required course of study specified in the approved degree plan for one of the technical curricula or approval by the Dean of Workforce Education or Dean of Education & Learning Services.
    2. At least 15 hours of general education with credit hours in each of the following areas: humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics/computer science.
    3. At least 25 percent of semester hours must be earned in college-level courses at MCC.
    4. Successful completion of the college’s Developmental Education Plan for the Texas Success Initiative.
  2. A grade point average of at least 2.0 in the workforce curriculum completed.
  3. A minimum grade of C in each major course in the workforce curriculum completed. A major course is a course that has the prefix of the program (i.e., POFT courses are major courses for all of the Office Technology program degrees or certificates). A minimum grade of C will be required for related courses when specified in the catalog course description as a prerequisite.
  4. A minimum grade of C will be required for courses transferred from another college or for substitution to satisfy degree requirements.
  5. Payment of all financial obligations to the college.

Tech-Prep

MCC participates in the state Tech-Prep program, which prepares today’s youth for high-demand technical careers by offering focused, sequenced programs of secondary and postsecondary study consisting of a four-year high school graduation plan and a two-year Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree plan. The Tech Prep articulated career path is a six-year plan of courses:

4 years of high school
+2 years of college
6-year program = Associate degree

MCC is actively involved in developing and providing Tech-Prep associate degree programs in cooperation with area independent school districts. Within articulated Tech-Prep programs are articulated courses—high school courses that contain the same course content as an equivalent college course and for which MCC has agreed to award college credit if the student meets requirements outlined in the course articulation agreement.

MCC currently offers Tech-Prep career paths in the following areas: Computer Information Systems & Multimedia (Application Development, Network Administration, Web Technologies, Information Systems & Applications, and Multimedia Management and Production), Business Programs (Accounting, Business Management, General Business, Paralegal and Marketing), Visual & Performing Arts (Commercial Music Management), and Office Technology Careers (Administrative Assistant, Medical Office Assistant, Digital Publishing Technology, and Computer Applications). Other technical areas will be added as articulation agreements are developed with area independent school districts.

Nursing_ADN Requirements for Tech-Prep Associate Degree

  1. While in high school, the student must follow a coherent sequence of designated courses for the chosen career path along with the requirements for the Recommended or Distinguished Plan.
  2. The student must earn a grade of B or higher in the articulated course(s). The student must also fulfill the learning outcome objectives on the completion of the articulated high school course and be recommended as being competent in the subject matter to be recognized for articulated credit at MCC.
  3. The student must have completed the articulated course(s) as a junior or senior in high school or through a coherent sequence of designated courses. The final course in the sequence must have been taken as a junior or senior.
  4. The student must meet all admission requirements to MCC and enroll within 15 months after high school graduation.
  5. The student must petition for the articulated credit in the Tech Prep office at MCC within 15 months after high school graduation.
  6. MCC will post articulated credit on the college transcript when the student completes six non-developmental college hours at the college with a grade point average of 2.0 or better. This requirement may be satisfied before high school graduation by dual credit or by qualifying AP or CLEP examination scores with a grade point average of 2.0 or better.
  7. The student can articulate a maximum of 12 college hours.
  8. Since a grade of CR (credit) is assigned to articulated courses, the grade does not affect a student’s college grade point average but will be included in accumulated college hours attempted and earned.
  9. Articulated credit will be granted only to those students who took the identified course when an official articulation agreement was in place between the school district and MCC.
  10. McLennan Community College guarantees the acceptance of articulated credit under the conditions specified above. Acceptance of articulated credit to colleges other than MCC will be subject to approval from the receiving institutions.
  11. McLennan Community College participates in the Advanced Technical Credit Program, which sets common statewide standards for the award of college credit for selected, content-enhanced high school courses. Advanced Technical Credit will be granted only to those students whose school district participates in the Advanced Technical Credit Program, high school teacher is Advanced Technical Credit certified, and credit is approved by the Division Directors at MCC.

Achieve Texas

Achieve Texas is an education initiative designed to prepare all students (preschool through college) for a lifetime of success. It allows all students to achieve excellence by preparing them for secondary and postsecondary opportunities, career preparation and advancement, meaningful work, and active citizenship.

This initiative uses the 16 federally defined Career Clusters of the States’ Career Clusters initiative as the foundation for restructuring how schools arrange their instructional programs. A Career Cluster is a grouping of occupations and broad industries based on commonalities. All clusters have been cross walked to the U.S. Department of Labor occupational classification system O*NET.

Most McLennan Community College degrees have been linked to a career cluster.

A.A.S. Degree Programs

The Associate in Applied Science degree is offered in these programs:

Business Careers

      Business Programs
            Accounting
            Business Management
            General Business
            Marketing
            Paralegal
            Real Estate
      Computer Information Systems
            Application Development
            Information Systems & Applications
            Network Administration
            Media Communications
      Office Technology Careers
            Administrative Assistant
            Digital Publishing Technology
            Health Information Technology
            Medical Office Assistant
            Computer Applications (Office Technology Careers Option)

Allied Health & Nursing

Associate Degree Nursing
Electroneurodiagnostics/Polysomnography
Medical Laboratory Technician
Physical Therapist Assistant
Radiologic Technology
Respiratory Care Technology

Human Services & Education

Child Development
Interpreter Training
Mental Health
      Mental Health Associate
      Substance Abuse and Addiction
      Youth Counseling


VetTech
Veterinary Technology


Visual and Performing Arts

      Commercial Music
            Audio Technology
            Commercial Music Management
            Performance
            Songwriting
            Venue and Talent Management

Requirements for a One-Year Certificate in Workforce Education

  1. Completion of a required approved plan for a Certificate of Completion, including at least 25 percent of semester hours of credit earned at MCC or approval by the Dean of Workforce Education or Dean of Education & Learning Services. Developmental courses may not be used to meet requirements for a certificate.
  2. A grade point average of at least 2.0 in the curriculum completed.
  3. A minimum grade of C in each major course in the workforce curriculum completed. A major course is a course that has the prefix of the program (i.e., POFI, POFL, POFM and POFT courses are major courses for all of the Office Technology Careers program degrees or certificates). A minimum grade of C will be required for related courses when specified in the catalog course description as a prerequisite or as specified in the certificate plan.
  4. Payment of all financial obligations to the college.

Certificate Programs

Certificates of Completion are offered in the following programs:

Business Careers
Business
      Accounting
      Business Management
      Entrepreneurship
      Marketing
      Real Estate
Computer Information Systems
      Applications Development
      CISCO
      Information Systems & Applications
      Internet Webmaster
      Media Communications
      Microsoft Windows
      Novell Network Administration
      Web Design
Office Technology Careers
      Coding Specialist
      Computer Applications/Software Applications Specialist
      Digital Publishing
      Medical Secretary Technology
      Medical Transcription
      Medical Unit Secretary
      Office Assistant Technology
      Secretarial Technology

Allied Health & Nursing
Computed Technology
Paramedicine
Surgical Technology
Vocational Nursing

Human Services & Education
Aesthetician
Child Development
      Option I
      Option II – Administration
Cosmetology
      Cosmetology Basic Operator
      Cosmetology Instructor Certificate
Interpreter Training
      Studies in Deafness
Long Term Care Administration
      Nursing Facility Administrator
      Assisted Living Management
Mental Health
      Mental Health
      Substance Abuse and Addiction
      Counselor Intern
      Youth Counseling

Visual and Performing Arts
Performance
Songwriting
Sound Reinforcement Level-One Enhanced Skills
Venue and Talent Management

Marketable Skill Awards

Marketable Skill Achievement Awards are offered in the following programs:

Business
Business

Computer Information Systems
CISCO
Electronic Media
Information Systems

Mental Health
Adolescent Residential Caregiver

Office Technology Careers
Basic Medical Transcription
Keyboarding and Business Document Formatting
Word Processing

General Education Requirements

Social &
Behavioral Science

Math/Natural Sciences
Humanities & Visual/
Performing Arts
Anthropology Biology Art/Music/Theatre
Economics Chemistry Literature
Psychology Physics Philosophy
Government Geology Cultural Studies
Sociology Math (college-level) Classical Languages
    Ethics

Transfer Programs (A.A., A.S. and A.A.T.)

McLennan Community College offers the Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, and the Associate of Arts in Teaching degrees, which are designed to transfer to bachelor’s degree programs in senior-level institutions.

Students who plan to obtain a bachelor’s degree should plan to take classes at McLennan Community College that meet the requirements of the senior institution at wich the degree work will be completed. Students are encouraged to work with advisors to plan their course work.

Texas public senior colleges and universities are required to accept by transfer up to 66 hours—or one-half of the bachelor’s degree requirements if that constitutes fewer than 66 hours of credits—earned by a student in a community or junior college. Additional course credits may be accepted in transfer at the discretion of the receiving institution.

Transfer Credit

Students enrolling in 12 or more semester hours or those who have completed 24 semester hours of credit should establish a degree plan with an academic advisor at McLennan Community College. This plan will help ensure that credits will transfer to a particular senior college and will apply toward the selected major course of study at that college. A change in major may result in previously acquired credits not counting toward requirements of the new major.

Questions or problems relating to course transfer matters should be directed to the Director of Career Development at MCC.

Requirements for the Associate in Arts (A.A.) Degree

  1. Credit for at least 60 semester hours of college work, excluding developmental courses.
    1. Fulfillment of the 47-hour core curriculum as part of the 60-hour total.
    2. At least 15 semester hours of sophomore-level courses, including six semester hours of government.
    3. At least 15 semester hours earned in college-level courses while enrolled at MCC.
    4. Two PHED activity courses.
    5. Credit for COSC 1301.
  2. An overall grade point average of at least 2.0.
  3. Successful completion of the college’s Developmental Education Plan for the Texas Success Initiative.
  4. Payment of all financial obligations to the college.

Requirements for the Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Students wishing to complete the Associate in Science degree will fulfill the same requirements listed for the Associate in Arts degree. The student will also be required to complete at least 15 hours of college-level mathematics and/or science courses.

Requirements for the Associate in Arts (A.A.) or Associate in Science (A.S.) Degrees Including a Field of Study

  1. Credit for between 60 and 66 hours of college work, depending upon the particular field of study and excluding developmental courses. Such credit shall include the following:
    1. Fulfillment of all course requirements in the particular field of study curriculum.
    2. Partial or complete fulfillment of the core curriculum as specified by each particular degree plan, depending on the number of credit hours required by the field of study curriculum.
    3. At least 15 semester hours of sophomore-level courses, including six semester hours of government courses.
    4. At least 15 semester hours earned in college-level courses while enrolled at MCC.
    5. ither one or two PHED activity courses as specified by each particular degree plan, depending on the field of study curriculum and the additional general educational requirements.
    6. Credit for COSC 1301 or a particular field of study course that also satisfies the computer literacy requirement.
  2. An overall grade point average of at least 2.0.
  3. Successful completion of the college’s Developmental Education Plan for the Texas Success Initiative.
  4. Payment of all financial obligations to the college.
  5. Minimum grade of C is required for all courses within the field of study.

Requirements for the Associate of Arts in Teaching (A.A.T.) Degree

  1. Credit for 65 semester hours of college work, depending on which of the two degree options are selected and excluding any developmental courses. Such credit shall include the following:
    1. Fulfillment of the 47-hour core curriculum, as part of the 65-hour total.
    2. MATH 1350 and 1351, along with MATH 1314 as a prerequisite.
    3. Either EDUC 1301 and 2301 plus six additional hours of science (for EC-4, 4-8, EC-12 certification) or TECA 1303, 1311, 1318, and 1354 (for Early Childhood Specialization only).
    4. At least 15 semester hours earned in college-level courses while enrolled at MCC.
  2. An overall grade point average of at least 2.0.
  3. Successful completion of the college’s Developmental Education Plan for the Texas Success Initiative.
  4. Payment of all financial obligations to the college.

Achieve Texas
Achieve Texas is an education initiative designed to prepare all students (preschool through college) for a lifetime of success. It allows all students to achieve excellence by preparing them for secondary and postsecondary opportunities, career preparation and advancement, meaningful work, and active citizenship.

This initiative uses the 16 federally defined Career Clusters of the States’ Career Clusters initiative as the foundation for restructuring how schools arrange their instructional programs. A Career Cluster is a grouping of occupations and broad industries based on commonalities. All clusters have been cross walked to the U.S. Department of Labor occupational classification system O*NET.

Most McLennan Community College degrees have been linked to a career cluster.

General Education Core Curriculum

The 75th Texas Legislature mandated that Texas colleges and universities must each develop a core curriculum of classes in “Liberal Arts, Humanities, Sciences, and Political, Social and Cultural History that all undergraduate students (except students in specifically designated ‘Fields of Study’) are required to complete before receiving an academic undergraduate degree.” (Texas Education Code, Chapter 61, Subchapter S, “Transfer of Credit”)

The core curriculum at MCC contains a variety of courses that encourage breadth of study so that students can reflect upon diverse individual, scientific, political, economic, social, and other cultural aspects of life. The core curriculum represents (1) the first steps students take in pursuit of a broad-based education; (2) the fundamental requirements of the Associate in Arts and the Associate in Science degrees; and (3) the commitment of each institution of higher education in Texas to help students transfer their core curriculum courses between schools.

Guidelines

  1. The first 47 hours completed in the core curriculum will be designated as such on the student’s MCC transcript.
  2. The core curriculum for MCC will be evaluated two years before the institution’s compliance report is due at the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
  3. In fulfilling the Natural Sciences requirements, the student will take two four-hour lab science courses with six hours satisfying Chart I and the additional two hours carrying over to Chart II.
  4. Students who plan to obtain a bachelor’s degree should consult with an academic advisor to arrange a program to meet the requirements of the senior college where the degree will be completed.
  5. A D grade earned in a core course at MCC will satisfy degree requirements for the Associate in Arts or the Associate in Science degrees. However, students should be aware that some receiving institutions may not accept the D grade for fulfillment of their degree requirements.

MCC Core Curriculum

Chart I
The student must complete 36 semester credit hours according to the parameters described below.
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 6   ENGL 1301 & 1302 or 2311
Mathematics 3   MATH 1314, 1316, 1324, 1332, 1342, 2412, 2413
Natural Sciences * 6   BIOL 1406, 1407, 1408, 1411, 1413, 2401, 2402, 2404, 2420
CHEM 1405, 1407, 1411, 1412
ENVR 1101/1301 (Both must be taken)
GEOL 1101/1301, 1403, or 1404
PHYS 1401, 1402, 1405, 1407, 2425, 2426
Humanities & Visual/Performing Arts 3   PHIL 1301 or Any sophomore-level literature course
  3   ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304
DRAM 1310, 2361, 2362
MUSI 1306, 1308, 1309, 1310
Social & Behavioral Sciences 6   HIST 1301 & 1302
  6   GOVT 2305 & 2306
  3   PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301
Total Minimum Requirement 36    
 
Chart II
The student must complete an additional 11 semester credit hours from the following:
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 3   COMM 1307
FREN 1411, 1412, 2311, 2312
GERM 1411, 1412
SPAN 1411, 1412, 2311, 2312
SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318, 1321, 2333
Natural Sciences * 2   The lab science courses listed in Chart I
Humanities & Visual/Performing Arts 3  

Any courses listed in Chart I in this category
ARTS 1311, 1316
DRAM 1351, 2366
HUMA 2319
MUEN 1121, 1141
PHIL 1316, 1317, 2306, 2374

Social & Behavioral Sciences 3   Any courses listed in Chart I in this category
ANTH 2346
CRIJ 1301
ECON 2301, 2302
GOVT 2304
PSYC 2314, 2315
SOCI 2301
Any sophomore-level history course
Total Additional Hours 11    

* In fulfilling the Natural Sciences requirement, the student will take two four-hour lab science courses with six hours satisfying Chart I and the additional two hours carrying over to Chart II.

Field of Study Curricula

A field of study curriculum is a group of courses approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board that can be taken at the community college level and transferred as a block into a specialized bachelor’s degree program at a state university. The number of hours required to complete each field of study varies among subject areas. In some cases, students will be able to complete the entire field of study as well as all the core curriculum courses. In other cases, students will be able to complete the field of study and partially complete the core curriculum.

MCC currently offers field of study programs in business, computer science, criminal justice, engineering, transfer music, and speech communication.

A.A. Degree with a Field of Study in Business

Business Field of Study Curriculum
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Economics 6   ECON 2301 and 2302***
Mathematics 3   MATH 1325*
Computer Literacy 3   BCIS 1305
Speech 3   SPCH 1315 or 1321***
Accounting 8   ACCT 2401 and 2402**
Total Hours 23    

*Prerequisite for MATH 1325 is MATH 1324
**ACNT 1303 is highly recommended as a prerequisite for ACCT 2401. One year of accounting in high school or work experience in an accounting capacity may be articulated for ACNT 1303.
***Both ECON and SPCH satisfy core curriculum, as well as field of study, requirements.

General Education Courses
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 6   ENGL 1301 & 1302 or 2311
Mathematics 3   MATH 1324
Natural Science 8   CHEM 1405, 1407, 1411, 1412
BIOL 1408, 1411, 1413, 2401, 2402, 2404, 1406, 1407, 2420
ENVR 1301/1101­ (Both must be taken)
GEOL 1403, 1404, 1301/1101 (Both must be taken)
PHYS 1401, 1402, 1405, 1407, 2425, 2426
Humanities & Visual/Performing Arts 3   PHIL 1301 or
Any sophomore-level literature course
  3   ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304
DRAM 1310, 2361, 2362
MUSI 1306, 1308, 1309, or 1310
  3   Any Humanities, Visual/Performing Arts course
Social Sciences 6   HIST 1301, 1302
  6   GOVT 2305, 2306
  3   PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301
MCC Courses 2   PHED Activity Courses
Total Hours 43    
Total Hours for degree = 66   Core Complete

 

A.S. Degree with a Field of Study in Computer Science

Computer Science Field of Study Curriculum
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Computer Science 3   COSC 1336 Programming Fund. I*
Computer Science 3   COSC 1337 Programming Fund. II
Computer Science 3   COSC 2336 Programming Fund. III
Computer Science 3   COSC 2325 Computer Organization and Machine Language
Mathematics 4   MATH 2413 Calculus I**
Mathematics 4   MATH 2414 Calculus II
Physics 4   PHYS 2425 Physics I
Physics 4   PHYS 2426 Physics II
Total Hours 28    

*Corequisite for COSC 1336 is COSC 1301.
**Prerequisite for MATH 2413 is MATH 2412.

Notes:

  1. COSC 1336/1436 and 1337/1437 are preparatory and sequential in nature; however, not all courses are required for the Computer Science major at all universities but may apply to general degree requirements.
    1. COSC 1336/1346 is not part of the Computer Science major requirements at the University of Texas at Austin, University of Texas at Arlington, University of Texas at Dallas, and Texas A&M University.
    2. COSC 1337/1437 is not part of the Computer Science major requirements at the University of Texas at Austin. Preparatory courses such as COSC 1336 and COSC 1337 will assist students that need additional background but do not apply toward the computer science major requirements.
  2. COSC 2325/2425 is not part of the Computer Science major requirements at the University of Texas at Austin or Texas A&M University but may be applied to general degree requirements.
  3. It is recommended that students complete the math sequence, physics sequence, and computer science sequence at the same institution to reduce the likelihood of potential gaps in the curriculum.

 

General Education Courses
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 6   ENGL 1301 & 1302 or 2311
  3   COMM 1307
FREN 1411, 1412, 2311, 2312
GERM 1411,1412
SPAN 1411, 1412, 2311, 2312
SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318, 1321, 2333
Humanities & Visual/Performing Arts 3   PHIL 1301 or
Any sophomore-level literature course
  3   ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304
DRAM 1310, 2361, 2362
MUSI 1306, 1308, 1309, 1310
  3   Any Humanities & Visual/Performing
Arts course
Social Sciences 6   HIST 1301, 1302
  6   GOVT 2305, 2306
  3   PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301
Social & Behavioral Sciences 3   ECON 2301, 2302
GOVT 2304
PSYC 2314, 2315
SOCI 2301
Any sophomore-level history course
MCC Courses 2   PHED Activity Courses
Total Hours 38    
Total Hours for degree = 66   Core Complete

 

A.A. Degree with a Field of Study in Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice Field of Study Curriculum
Course Semester Credit Hours   Course Title
CRIJ 1301 3   Introduction to Criminal Justice
CRIJ 1306 3   Court Systems & Practices
CRIJ 1310 3   Fundamentals of Criminal Law
CRIJ 2313 3   Correctional Systems & Practices
CRIJ 2328 3   Police Systems & Practices
Total Hours 15    

 

General Education Courses
Chart I
     
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 6   ENGL 1301 & 1302 or 2311
Mathematics 3   MATH 1314, 1324, 1332, 1342, 2412, 2413
Natural Sciences * 6   BIOL 1408, 1411, 1413, 2401, 2402, 2404, 1406, 1407, 2420
CHEM 1405, 1407, 1411, 1412
ENVR 1301/1101 (Both must be taken)
GEOL 1403, 1404, 1301/1101 (Both must be taken)
PHYS 1401, 1402, 1405, 1407, 2425, 2426
Humanities & Visual/Performing Arts 3   PHIL 1301
Any sophomore-level literature course
  3   ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304
DRAM 1310, 2361, 2362
MUSI 1306, 1308, 1309, 1310
Social & Behavioral Sciences 6   HIST 1301 & 1302
  6   GOVT 2305 & 2306
  3   PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301
Total Hours 36    


Chart II      
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 3   COMM 1307
FREN 1411, 1412, 2311, 2312
GERM 1411, 1412
SPAN 1411, 1412, 2311, 2312
SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318, 1321, 2333
Natural Sciences * 2   The lab science courses listed in Chart I
Humanities & Visual/Performing Arts 3   Any courses listed in Chart I in this category
ARTS 1311 or 1316
DRAM 1351, 2366
HUMA 2319
MUEN 1121, 1141
PHIL 1316, 1317, 2306, 2374
Social & Behavioral Sciences 3   Any courses listed in Chart I Sciences
ANTH 2346
CRIJ 1301
ECON 2301, 2302
GOVT 2304
PSYC 2314, 2315
SOCI 2301
Any sophomore-level history course
MCC Courses 1   PHED Activity Course
  3   COSC 1301
Total Additional Hours 15    
Total Hours for degree = 66   Core Complete

  * In fulfilling the Natural Sciences requirement, the student will take two four-hour lab science courses with six hours satisfying Chart I and the additional two hours carrying over to Chart II.

 

A.S. Degree with a Field of Study in Engineering

Engineering Field of Study Curriculum
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Mathematics 18   MATH 2318, 2320­, 2413, 2414, 2415
Engineering 9   ENGR 2301, 2302, 2305
Physics 8   PHYS 2425, 2426
Chemistry 8   CHEM 1411, 1412
Total Hours 43    

 

General Education Courses
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 3   ENGL 1301
Humanities 3   PHIL 1301
Social Sciences 12   HIST 1301, 1302
GOVT 2305, 2306
Other Engineering 4   ENGR 1201, 1204
MCC Course 1   PHED Activity course
Total Hours 23    
Total Hours for degree = 66   NOT Core Complete

 

A.A. Degree with a Field of Study in Music

Music Field of Study Curriculum
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Theory/Aural Skills 16   MUSI 1311, 1312, 1116, 1117
MUSI 2311, 2312, 2116, 2117
Principal Instrument 8   MUAP 12XX
Keyboard Competency 4   MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182, or
MUAP 1169, 1269
Music Literature 3   MUSI 1308 or 1309
Major Ensemble 4   MUEN 1121 or 1141
Total Hours 35    

 

General Education Courses
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 6   ENGL 1301 & 1302 or 2311
Mathematics or Natural Science 3-4   MATH 1314, 1324, 1332, 1342, 2412, 2413
BIOL 1408, 1411, 1413, 2401, 2402, 1406, 1407, 2404, 2420
CHEM 1405, 1407, 1411, 1412
ENVR 1301/1101 (Both must be taken)
GEOL 1403, 1404, 1101/1301 (Both must be taken)
PHYS 1401, 1402, 1405, 1407, 2425, 2426
Humanities & Visual/Performing Arts 3   PHIL 1301 or
Any sophomore-level literature course
ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304
DRAM 1310, 2361, 2362
MUSI 1308, 1309, 1306, 1310
Social Sciences 6   HIST 1301, 1302
  6   GOVT 2305, 2306
MCC Courses 2   PHED Activity Courses
  3   COSC 1301
Total Hours 29-30    
Total Hours for degree = 64-65   NOT Core Complete

 

A.A. Degree with a Field of Study in Speech Communication*

Field of Study Curriculum
Course Semester Credit Hours   Course Title
SPCH 1311 3   Introduction to Speech Communication
SPCH 1318 3   Interpersonal Communication
SPCH 2333 3   Discussion & Small Group Communication
SPCH 1315 OR
SPCH 1321
3   Public Speaking OR
Business and Professional Communication
Total Hours 12    


Complete Core Curriculum:
Chart I
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication 6   ENGL 1301 & 1302 or 2311
Mathematics 3   MATH 1314, 1324, 1332, 1342, 2412, 2413, 1316
Natural Sciences ** 6   BIOL 1408, 1411, 1413, 2401, 2402, 2404, 1406, 1407, 2420
CHEM 1405, 1407, 1411, 1412
ENVR 1301/1101 (Both must be taken)
GEOL 1403, 1404, 1301/1101 (Both must be taken)
PHYS 1401, 1402, 1405, 1407, 2425, 2426
Humanities &­Visual/Performing Arts 3   PHIL 1301
Any sophomore-level literature course
  3   ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304
DRAM 1310, 2361, 2362
MUSI 1306, 1308, 1309, 1310
Social Sciences 6   HIST 1301 & 1302
  6   GOVT 2305 & 2306
  3   PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301
Total Minimum Hours 36    

*For information regarding the Media Communications Certificate, see the Workforce Education section.

 

Chart II
Component Area Required Semester Credit Hours   To Be Selected From
Communication (3)   SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318, 1321, 2333 *
Natural Sciences ** 2   The lab science courses listed in Chart I
Humanities & Visual/Performing Arts 3   Any courses listed in Chart I in this category
ARTS 1311 or 1316
DRAM 1351, 2366
HUMA 2319
MUEN 1121, 1141
PHIL 1316, 1317, 2306, 2374
Social & Behavioral Sciences 3   Any courses listed in Chart I Sciences
ANTH 2346
CRIJ 1301
ECON 2301, 2302
GOVT 2304
PSYC 2314, 2315
SOCI 2301
Any sophomore-level history course
Total Minimum Hours 8 *    

* SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318, 1321, or 2333, which are included in the field of study, will satisfy the Communication requirement in Chart II. Hence, there will only be a total of eight additional hours required in Chart II.
** In fulfilling the Natural Sciences requirement, the student will take two four-hour lab science courses with six hours satisfying Chart I and the additional two hours carrying over to Chart II.

 

Other Requirements
Computer Literacy 3 COSC 1301
Health and Physical Education 2 Any two activity courses
Total Hours 5  
Total Hours for degree = 61 Core Complete

 

Recommended Programs of Study with Special Areas of Emphasis*

Associate in Science with an Emphasis in Agriculture
Students knowledgeable in agricultural science and management have a full spectrum of career paths from which to choose. Individuals with a background in agriculture work in private and governmental industries in such fields as agricultural engineering, agronomy, animal breeding and genetics, animal nutrition, soil science, and wildlife science. The recommended curriculum below is designed to meet the requirements of the core curriculum leading to an A.S. degree, with a special emphasis in agriculture. It will provide students with a general background in agriculture, as well as the opportunity to take more specific electives in order to pursue a bachelor’s degree at a four-year institution.

Freshman Year
Fall Semester
BIOL 1413 Introductory Zoology 4 hrs
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I 3 hrs
MATH 1314 College Algebra 3 hrs
AGRI 1419 Intro to Animal Science 4 hrs
AGRI 1131 The Ag Industry 1 hr
PHED 1 hr
  16 hrs
Spring Semester
ENGL 1302 Freshman Composition II 3 hrs
PSYC 2301 General Psychology 3 hrs
HIST 1301 History of U.S. to 1877 3 hrs
AGRI 2321 Livestock Evaluation I 3 hrs
AGRI 2317 Ag Economics 3 hrs
PHED 1 hr
  16 hrs
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
GOVT 2305 National Government 3 hrs
Visual and Performing Arts (Chart I) 3 hrs
HIST 1302 History of U.S. from 1877 3 hrs
AGRI 1329 Principles of Food Science 3 hrs
AGRI 1309 Computers in Ag 3 hrs
  15 hrs
Spring Semester
SPCH 1315 Public Speaking 3 hrs
AGRI 1407 Agronomy 4 hrs
AGRI 2301 Agricultural Power Units 3 hrs
Humanities (Chart I) 3 hrs
Humanities/Visual Arts (Chart II) 3 hrs
GOVT 2306 Texas Government 3 hrs
  19 hrs

*These recommended programs of study do not reflect articulation agreements with specific universities nor any formal fields of study approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Biomedical Science Transfer Agreement with Texas A&M University

An agreement signed with Texas A&M University will facilitate the admission and academic transfer of students from MCC to the Biomedical Science (BIMS) Department in the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine. This agreement will ensure a seamless transition of the student into the Biomedical Science program at Texas A&M University.

What does a Biomedical Science degree offer?
This degree gives the student a strong background in the sciences and provides the fundamental knowledge on which to build the skills needed for successful vocational achievements. The depth of training in the sciences and emphasis on the application of knowledge to health problem solving assists the Biomedical Science graduates in securing productive careers in a wide variety of biomedical endeavors.

What can I do with a Biomedical Science background?
Biomedical Science graduates enter schools of human medicine, veterinary medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, podiatry, and law. All of the pre-professional course requirements for any of these can be completed while registered in the Biomedical Science curriculum. In addition to this, the Biomedical Science curriculum prepares the students for the basic course work required for allied health fields such as nursing, physical therapy, physician assistant, dental hygiene, health care administration, and occupational therapy.

What are the requirements at McLennan Community College for me to participate in the 2+2 articulation agreement?
McLennan Community College students who complete MCC’s portion of the Biomedical Science degree plan as full-time students (see below) will be admitted to the BIMS program automatically, provided they:

  • meet all other requirements (i.e., transcripts, applications, timelines, deadline dates, etc.) for general admission to Texas A&M University.
  • are in good standing and have maintained no less than a cumulative 3.6 GPA in the courses taken at McLennan Community College.
  • have not have made any grade below a B in all of their required science and math course work.

Articulated Biomedical Science Degree Plan*

First Semester
ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I 3 hrs
BIOL 1413 General Zoology 4 hrs
HIST 1301 History of U.S. to 1877 3 hrs
MATH 2413 Calculus I 4 hrs
CHEM 1411 General Chemistry w/Lab 4 hrs
  18 hrs

Second Semester
MATH 2414 Calculus II 4 hrs
BIOL 1411 General Botany 4 hrs
HIST 1302 History of U.S. from 1877 to Present 3 hrs
CHEM 1412 General Chemistry II 4 hrs
Humanities (from MCC Core Curriculum) 3 hrs
  18 hrs

Third Semester
GOVT 2305 U.S. Government 3 hrs
CHEM 2423 Organic Chemistry I w/Lab 4 hrs
Social & Behavioral Science (from MCC Core Curriculum) 3 hrs
ENGL 2311 Technical Writing 3 hrs
PHYS 1401 General Physics I 4 hrs
  17 hrs

Fourth Semester
GOVT 2306 Texas State and Local Government 3 hrs
CHEM 2425 Organic Chemistry II 4 hrs
Visual & Performing Arts (from MCC Core Curriculum) 3 hrs
Social & Behavioral Science (from MCC Core Curriculum) 3 hrs
PHYS 1402 General Physics II 4 hrs
  17 hrs
Total 70 hrs

*Not Core Complete

Academic Policies

Like all other colleges, McLennan Community College follows policies and procedures that guide grades, class attendance, scholastic probation, degree plans, credit by examination, and other subjects. These instructional guidelines, which are established by the college and sometimes by governmental regulation, are discussed in this chapter.

mcc8This chapter also lists organizations and agencies that provide accreditation, recognition, and approval for the MCC’s programs.

Degree Requirements

McLennan Community College offers four degrees.

Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree and Associate in Science (A.S.) degree

These degrees are awarded to students who complete 60 to 66 hours of credit in college-level courses. The courses are often called “transfer” programs because they provide the two-year foundation for transferring to a four-year college and earning a bachelor’s degree (see Requirements for the A.A. Degree). For some areas, students can complete an approved field of study curriculum as part of their degree. Such a field of study curriculum will transfer as a designated block of courses to public universities in Texas.

Associate of Arts in Teaching (A.A.T.) degree

This degree is awarded to students who complete the 65-hour curriculum, which has been designed for transfer into any baccalaureate program in education (see Requirements for the A.A.T. Degree.. Such students should be seeking initial Texas teacher certification either in EC-4 (except Early Childhood Specialization), 4-8, EC-12 or in Early Childhood Specialization only.

Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree

This degree is awarded to students who complete a minimum of 60 hours of college work in one of MCC’s workforce programs, including 15 hours of general education credit (see Requirements for the A.A.S. Degree). The degree is awarded to students who seek immediate employment in the workforce or who may transfer to a senior college.


Graduation Requirements for the Associate Degree

Each student’s course of study leading to an associate degree is determined by the degree requirements in effect at the time the student first enrolls in college-level courses at MCC. From the date of that initial enrollment, the student has five years to complete an associate degree (A.A., A.A.S., A.A.T., or A.S.). After five years, the student will be subject to any new degree requirements that may be in effect when the student next enrolls. Exceptions to these requirements must be approved by the appropriate Dean.

Certificate of Completion

A certificate is awarded to students who complete specified requirements as outlined in programs awarding certificate recognition. There are two levels of certificates: Level One requires completion of 15 to 42 semester hours; Level Two requires completion of 43 to 59 semester hours.

Transfer Information

All lower-division academic courses shall be fully transferable among public institutions and must count toward the same degree at any public college or university in Texas.

  1. Each institution of higher education shall identify in its undergraduate catalog each lower-division course that is substantially equivalent to an academic course listed in the current edition of the Lower Division Academic Course Guide Manual by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

  2. Each university must offer at least 45 semester credit hours of academic courses that are substantially equivalent to courses listed in the Lower Division Academic Course Guide Manual, including those that fulfill the lower-division portion of the institution’s Core Curriculum.

  3. All public colleges and universities must accept transfer of credit for successfully completed courses identified in (a) and (b) as applicable to an associate or baccalaureate degree in the same manner as credit awarded to non-transfer students in that major.

  4. Each institution shall be required to accept in transfer into a baccalaureate degree the number of lower-division credit hours in a major that are allowed for its non-transfer students in that major; however,
    1. No institution shall be required to accept in transfer more credit hours in a major than the number set out in the applicable Coordinating Board-approved Transfer Curriculum for that major, as prescribed by the current issue of the Coordinating Board’s guide to transfer curricula and transfer of credit, Transfer of Credit Policies and Curricula.
    2. In any major for which there is no Coordinating Board-approved Transfer Curriculum, no institution shall be required to accept in transfer more lower-division course credit in the major applicable to a baccalaureate degree than the institution allows its non-transfer students in that major.
    3. A university may deny the transfer of credit in courses with a grade of D as applicable to the student’s field of study courses, core curriculum courses, or major.

  5. All senior institutions of higher education in Texas shall provide support services for transfer students equivalent to those provided to non-transfer students regularly enrolled at the institutions, including an orientation program for transfer students equivalent to that provided for entering freshman enrollees.

  6. No university shall be required to accept in transfer or toward a degree more than 66 semester credit hours of academic credits earned by a student in a community college. Universities, however, may choose to accept additional credit hours.

Penalty for Noncompliance with Transfer Rules

If it is determined by the Coordinating Board that an institution inappropriately or unnecessarily required a student to retake a course that is substantially equivalent to a course already taken at another institution, in violation of the provisions of section 5.372, formula funding for credit hours in the repeated course will be deducted from the institution’s appropriations.

Resolution of Transfer Disputes for Lower-Division Courses

  1. The following procedures shall be followed by public institutions of higher education in the resolution of credit transfer disputes involving lower-division courses:
    1. If an institution of higher education does not accept course credit earned by a student at another institution of higher education, the receiving institution shall give written notice to the student and to the sending institution that transfer of the course credit is denied. A receiving institution shall also provide written notice of the reasons for denying credit for a particular course or set of courses at the request of the sending institution.
    2. A student who receives notice as specified in subsection (1) of this section may dispute the denial of credit by contacting a designated official at either the sending or the receiving institution.
    3. The two institutions and the student shall attempt to resolve the transfer of the course credit in accordance with Coordinating Board rules and guidelines.
    4. If the transfer dispute is not resolved to the satisfaction of the student or the sending institution within 45 days after the date the student received written notice of denial, the institution that denies the course credit for transfer shall notify the Commissioner of Higher Education of its denial and the reasons for the denial.

  2. The Commissioner of Higher Education or the Commissioner’s designee shall make the final determination about a dispute concerning the transfer of course credit and give written notice of the determination to the involved student and institutions.

  3. Each institution of higher education shall publish in its course catalogs the procedures specified in subsections (a), (b), (d), and (e) of this section.

  4. The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board shall collect data on the types of transfer disputes that are reported and the disposition of each case that is considered by the Commissioner or the Commissioner’s designee.

  5. If a receiving institution has cause to believe that a course being presented by a student for transfer from another school is not of an acceptable level of quality, it should first contact the sending institution and attempt to resolve the problem. In the event that the two institutions are unable to come to a satisfactory resolution, the receiving institution may notify the Commissioner of Higher Education, who may investigate the course. If its quality is found to be unacceptable, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board may discontinue funding for the course.

Guarantee for Job Competency

  1. The graduate must have earned the Associate in Applied Science degree or Certificate of Completion beginning August 1, 1992, in a workforce program identified in the college’s General Catalog.

  2. The graduate must have completed requirements for the Associate in Applied Science degree or Certificate of Completion with the McLennan Community College system, with a minimum 75 percent of credits earned at MCC, and must have completed the degree or certificate within a four-year time span from initial enrollment.

  3. Graduates must be employed full time in an area directly related to the area of program concentration as certified by the appropriate administrative officer.

  4. Employment must commence within 12 months of graduation.

  5. The employer must certify in writing that the employee is lacking entry-level skills identified by MCC as program-exit competencies and must specify the areas of deficiency within 90 days of the graduate’s initial employment.

  6. The employer, graduate, and assigned representative(s) of the college will develop a written educational plan for retraining.

  7. Retraining will be limited to nine credit hours related to the identified skill deficiency and to those classes regularly scheduled during the period covered by the retraining plan.

  8. All retraining must be completed within a calendar year from the time the educational plan is agreed upon.

  9. The graduate and/or employer is responsible for the cost of books, insurance, uniforms, fees, and other course-related expenses.

  10. The guarantee does not imply that the graduate will pass any licensing or qualifying examination for a particular career.

A student’s sole remedy against MCC and its employees for skill deficiencies shall be limited to nine credit hours of tuition-free education under the conditions described above. Activation of the “Graduate Guarantee Program” may be initiated by the graduate by contacting the appropriate MCC administrative office within 90 days of the graduate’s initial employment.

Credit-By-Articulation

Credit-by-articulation allows students the opportunity to receive college credit at MCC for specific courses taken during the junior or senior year of high school. Students must complete the identified high school course(s) with a grade of B or better, meet all admission requirements to MCC, and enroll at the college within 24 months of high school graduation. Credit-by-articulation will only be granted if a formal articulation agreement is in effect between the school district and MCC at the time the student completes the course. Participating school districts and course listings can be obtained from high school counselors or through the Dean of Workforce Education.

Tech-Prep

MCC participates in the state Tech-Prep initiative, which permits high school students to get an early start on their career goals. Through course articulation, MCC and the high school agree on course competencies to be taught. The student may receive up to 12 semester hours of credit when he/she enroll and may complete an equal number of hours toward an approved Tech-Prep degree at MCC.

A Tech-Prep articulated career path is a six-year plan of courses, beginning with grade nine in the secondary school and continuing through the two-year associate degree program in the community college. Tech-Prep programs are designed to prepare a high-quality workforce that meets current and future regional labor market demands by ensuring that students exit high school and/or community college with marketable skills and the credentials to pursue higher education.

MCC is actively involved in developing and providing Tech-Prep associate degree programs in cooperation with the area independent school districts. The guidelines for Credit-by-articulation apply to all Tech-Prep programs.

Students should contact their high school counselor or the Dean of Workforce Education at MCC to determine if their school has an agreement with MCC. Students participating in a high school tech-prep program who plan to continue their tech-prep program at MCC must meet the entry requirements of the college and the specified program they are pursuing. See Requirements for Tech-Prep Associate’s Degree for more information.

Advising

Advising is a process that assists students in the formulation of educational and career plans for the realization of their life goals. Advisors will assist students with defining and refining goals; gaining an understanding of their academic abilities, skills, and interests; evaluating alternative courses of action; selecting an educational program; and selecting courses. The ultimate responsibility for making decisions about life goals, educational plans, and course selection rests with the student.

Class Attendance Policy

Regular and punctual attendance is expected of all students, and each instructor should maintain a complete record of attendance for the entire length of each course. Students will be counted absent from class meetings missed, beginning with the first official day of classes. Students, whether present or absent, are responsible for all material presented or assigned for a course and will be held accountable for such materials in the determination of course grades.

Absence from 25 percent of scheduled lecture and/or laboratory meetings will be taken as evidence that a student does not intend to complete the course. Unless an instructor has reason to believe the student will complete the course, the student will be withdrawn from the course with a grade of W. The instructor may reinstate the student if satisfied that the student will resume regular attendance and will complete the course.

If the student’s 25 percent absences are reached after the official drop date (the 60 percent point in the semester or term), the instructor may assign a W, if the student is passing and requests to be withdrawn. However, if a student who is not passing reaches the 25 percent point after the official drop date, the student will receive an F. In extenuating circumstances, the instructor may assign a W to a student who is not passing.

Each absence will count toward attendance requirements in each course.

Students will be permitted to make up class work and assignments missed due to absences caused by (1) authorized participation in official college functions, (2) personal illness, (3) an illness or a death in the immediate family, or (4) observance of a religious holy day (see policy). Also, the instructor has the prerogative of determining whether a student may make up work missed due to absences for other reasons. It is the student’s responsibility to inform the instructor of the reason for an absence and to do so in a timely fashion.

Students enrolled in THEA mandated developmental classes based on MCC’s developmental education plan must adhere to attendance requirements as established by developmental education guidelines. Students who are required by the Texas Success Initiative to take a developmental course or courses will be required to follow the attendance guidelines in effect at the time of the student’s enrollment in the developmental course or courses.

Programs such as Cosmetology, Performing Arts and many of the Allied Health & Nursing may have departmental attendance guidelines due to clinical requirements or requirements of approving agencies. (See appropriate departmental policies for details.)

Student Absences on Religious Holy Days

McLennan Community College shall excuse a student from attending classes or other required activities, including examinations, for the observance of a religious holy day, including travel for that purpose. Students are required to file a written request with each instructor for an excused absence. A student whose absence is excused for this observance may not be penalized for that absence and shall be allowed to take an examination or complete an assignment from which the student is excused within a reasonable time after the absence. Religious holy day means a holy day observed by a religion whose places of worship are exempt from property taxation under the Texas Tax Code.

McLennan Community College may not excuse absences for religious holy days that may interfere with patient care.

Developmental Studies

Developmental courses are designed to help students improve basic skills so they may realize their potential for success in college. Although designed to fulfill the student’s own desire for preparation, some of these courses may be required of students whose academic record or test scores indicate the need for skill development. These courses will not be counted toward graduation requirements at MCC and usually are not transferable to universities or other senior institutions. The following are developmental courses/programs:

English 0300, Basic Grammar and Composition I
English 0301, Basic Grammar and Composition II
English as a Second Language 0300, Developmental Composition and Reading I
English as a Second Language 0301, Developmental Composition and Reading II
Human Development 001R, Reading Remediation
Human Development 001M, Math Remediation
Human Development 001W, Writing Remediation
Math 0100, Basic Concepts in Arithmetic
Math 0101, Basic Applications of Arithmetic
Math 0102, Pre-Algebra I
Math 0103, Pre-Algebra II
Math 0104, Pre-Algebra III
Math 0105, Beginning Algebra I
Math 0106, Beginning Algebra II
Math 0107, Beginning Algebra III
Math 0300, Basic Mathematics
Math 0301, Prealgebra
Math 0307, Elementary Algebra
Math 0311, Intermediate Algebra
Reading 0300, Fundamentals of Reading
Reading 0301, Introduction to College Reading
Reading 0302, Reading Comprehension and Analysis

Student Classification

Students will be classified as freshmen until they have earned 30 semester hours of credit. They will be classified as sophomores if they have earned from 30 to 64 hours of credit.

Students are classified as full time if they are enrolled for 12 or more semester hours, or the contact-hour equivalent, and part time if they are enrolled for fewer than 12 semester hours, or the contact-hour equivalent.

 

Student Course Loads

The normal student course load during a long session semester is 15 to 17 semester hours. First-semester freshmen are encouraged to limit themselves to the number of semester hours shown in the student’s course of study (major) in the General Catalog.

The maximum course load for a summer term is seven semester hours. A student may register for no more than nine semester hours in a summer day and concurrent evening term combined. A student may not receive credit for more than 14 semester hours for a full summer term. Students requesting special approval to exceed any of these limits should determine if the institution to which they expect to transfer will accept credits earned under such conditions. The maximum course load for a three-week minimester term is three semester hours.

To register for 18 or more semester hours in a fall or spring semester or to exceed the maximum loads for a summer term, a student must have special approval of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, Dean of Workforce Education, Dean of Education & Learning Services, Director of Records and Registration, Director of Career Development, Vice President of Student Services, or appropriate division director. Among factors to be considered in the decision to grant or deny students such approval are:

  1. Previous college course load(s) and grades earned.
  2. High school academic record.
  3. Standardized or special test scores.
  4. Anticipated workload and/or co-curricular activities.
  5. Nature of the courses or courses of study to be undertaken.
  6. Special circumstances such as the number of semester hours remaining to complete degree or certificate requirements.

Auditors

An auditor is an observer in a college credit course and is subject to the same tuition and fees as if taking the course for credit. Auditors do not receive college credit.

A course that has been audited must be repeated if credit is to be awarded. Auditors must be eligible for admission to the college; their names will appear on the class roll. Auditors are entitled to use laboratory equipment and supplies or participate in field work on a space-available basis. The instructor, however, is not obligated to take any papers or examinations from the auditor.

Auditors must receive approval to audit courses from the appropriate program director or division director, who shall have the authority to grant permission to audit courses in their areas of responsibility. Lecture courses are the most appropriate for students to audit. Auditors may not be accepted in certain courses due to lack of space, course prerequisites, entrance requirements for a particular program, or the amount of individualized instructional time required, such as in internship courses.

A student may change from credit to audit status, with the approval of the appropriate program director or division director, provided the change is made before the 12th class day in a fall or spring semester, the fourth class day in a summer term, or before the census day for minimester courses or courses beginning at irregular times during a semester or term.

 

Finals Preparation Week

A period of approximately one week, known as Finals Preparation Week, will be designated near the end of each fall and spring semester by the Vice President of Instruction. Although the purpose of this period is to provide students maximum freedom to prepare for final examinations and otherwise complete course work requirements, it is also one of the weeks designated for instruction. Therefore, all classes will meet as regularly scheduled during the week preceding final examinations.

Beginning with the Wednesday of Finals Preparation Week, no major examinations will be given, with the exception of skills, laboratory, or clinical finals. Term papers or any other projects due during the week before final examinations must be assigned in writing at the beginning of the semester. Written instructions for such papers and projects should be provided to the students in a timely manner.

The Vice President of Instruction shall be responsible for making judgments on questions related to this policy and for granting exceptions to the policy.

 

Course Credits

The semester hour is the unit of credit and is defined as the amount of credit given for one lecture hour per week for 16 weeks or its equivalent. A lecture class meeting three hours per week, therefore, counts three semester hours.

Laboratory work may add a semester hour of credit to a course. In general, three hours of carefully planned and supervised laboratory work are equivalent to one hour of lecture or recitation. Field experience also may add semester hours to the course value. In general, four to six hours of field experience are equivalent to one hour of lecture.

Course Numbers

McLennan Community College has adopted the Texas Common Course Numbering System to help students transfer general academic courses between colleges and universities throughout Texas. Common courses are freshman and sophomore academic credit courses identified as common by institutions that are members of the Common Course Numbering System.

The Common Course number has a standardized four-letter prefix followed by a four-digit number. The four-letter prefix identifies the subject area.

The first digit identifies the course as either freshman level (1) or sophomore level (2). The second digit identifies the number of credit hours students earn upon completing the course. Usually this digit will be 1, 2, 3, or 4. The final two digits establish the sequence in which courses are often taken. For example, ENGL 1301 is taken before ENGL 1302. Both 1301 and 1302 are freshman-level courses with a semester credit hour value of three hours each. Courses that begin with a 0 are developmental (not college level) and do not count toward graduation.

If a course does not have a Common Course number, it does not suggest that the course will not transfer or meet degree requirements. For example, any number of Visual and Performing Arts credits may satisfy degree requirements at most colleges, while only one course will have the Common Course number that refers to Survey of Art History, Music Appreciation, or Theatre Appreciation.

Each college or university will continue to offer a wide variety of unique courses meant to primarily satisfy degree requirements in their respective programs. These courses may also be identified with Common Course numbers. In such cases, students may need to seek further assistance in planning their transfer program.

Credit By Examination

Students who believe they already possess the knowledge and/or skills taught in certain courses or programs offered by McLennan Community College will be given the opportunity to receive credit by special examination in courses where proficiency may be determined appropriately by examination.

Credit by examination is available to students who plan to enter the college and to students who are currently enrolled. The college awards credit for successful completion of MCC departmental examinations and various examinations published by the College Board, including the College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP) and the College Level Examination Program Subject Exams (CLEP-S).

Application Procedures

  1. College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
    Under the College Level Examination Program, the college will award credit for only the specified subject examinations. General examinations are not accepted. As with other testing programs, a student may attempt a CLEP examination at a national CLEP test center before enrolling and have the scores reported to the college. These examinations are also offered at MCC through the Testing Services Center. Further information concerning CLEP tests may be obtained from high school counselors and principals; College Level Examination Program (Box 1821, Princeton, N.J. 09540; e-mail clep@info.college-board.org or call 800-257-9558); or the MCC Testing Services Center.
  2. College Board Advanced Placement Program Examination (AP)
    The Advanced Placement examination is the final examination for a nationally standardized course offered in a limited number of secondary schools. The objective of the AP is to allow students to begin work toward college credits while still in high school. Students should check with their high school counselors or principal as to the availability of the AP examinations in their school. The AP is offered each May at participating high schools.
  3. MCC Departmental Examinations
    Departmental examinations are available for many courses offered by the college. For specific examinations available and for application forms, contact the respective departments. An application form for each examination must be approved by the appropriate division director or program director, who will designate an instructor to prepare, administer, and grade the examination.

General Rules and Procedures

A student may request permission to challenge a course for credit by examination provided the student has not completed the course or enrolled in a higher-level sequential course for credit, whether at McLennan Community College or elsewhere.

The student is responsible for having exam scores sent to the MCC Coordinator of Student Admissions unless tests are taken at McLennan Community College. Scores for CLEP and AP examinations should be received prior to enrollment for use in course advisement and placement.

Credit earned by examination will not become a part of the student’s permanent record until an equivalent number of semester hours has been earned in non-developmental classes at MCC.

Generally, no more than 24 hours of credit by examination may be obtained either at McLennan Community College, by transfer from other institutions, or a combination thereof.

To receive credit by examination at MCC, a student must score at or above the C-level. The course number, title, and credit hours will be entered on the student’s permanent record with notation of the type test taken and the score.

A grade of CR (credit) will be assigned for any course in which credit is earned by examination. This grade is not computed in the grade point average.

Credit by examination may be attempted only one time in a given course.

There will be no refund and no entry made on the student’s permanent record in case of failure of an examination for credit.

Students should direct inquiries concerning courses available for credit by examination to the appropriate division director or program director.

 

Credit Through Advanced Standing

Advanced standing is a means whereby a student may be placed in an upper-level course and at the same time receive academic credit for a lower-level prerequisite course in the same subject.

Advanced standing may be accomplished for certain courses in English and mathematics on the basis of scores achieved on the American College Testing (ACT) Assessment or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).

Students must make application for advanced standing in the Testing Services Center. Failure to gain approval for advanced standing may result in no credit for the lower-level course if an upper-level course is taken without such approval. Advanced standing may be attempted only one time in a given course. Contact the Testing Services Center for additional information.

Licensed Vocational Nurses

A Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) who wishes to obtain advanced standing in the Associate Degree Nursing Program has two options and must meet specific admission requirements. All Licensed Vocational Nurses must:

  • Apply for advanced standing.
  • Have a valid current Texas vocational nurse license.
  • Submit official copies of all college transcripts.

Licensed Vocational Nurses who qualify for advanced placement by completing the leveling course RNSG 1327 (Transition from Vocational to Professional Nursing) must demonstrate:

  • Completion of all admission requirements to MCC.
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses as required for entry into Level III of the Associate Degree Nursing Program. (Courses taken at another college or university will be evaluated on an individual basis.)
  • A cumulative grade point average of 2.75 or better in all courses applicable toward the Associate Degree Nurse Program.
  • Passing scores on LPN GAP Test. Upon completion of RNSG 1327, the student is granted credit for RNSG 1293, 1462, 1463, 1523, 2504, and 1160 and may enroll in the first sophomore Associate Degree Nursing courses, RNSG 2462 and 2514. Enrollment is limited to the number of vacancies in the course. Note: Licensed Vocational Nurses who have enrolled and failed in the Associate Degree Nursing Program are not eligible for RNSG 1327.

Licensed vocational nurses who qualify for advanced standing by completing department challenge examinations must demonstrate a grade of C or better in all Level I and Level II nursing challenge examinations.
Note:

  1. Challenge examinations may not be taken until all course prerequisites are met.
  2. A course may be challenged by examination once.
  3. A grade of CR is recorded on the student’s permanent record if the student receives a passing grade.
  4. Licensed vocational nurses who fail a challenge examination have two options to continue in the program:
    1. Enroll in and successfully complete the course; or
    2. Apply for the transition course, RNSG 1327.

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basic

By passing the National Registry EMT-Basic certifying examination, students may earn college credit. In order to receive credit, the applicant must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Meet all admission requirements of the college.
  2. Present a copy of the National Registry EMT-Basic exam scores to the Paramedicine Program Director.
  3. Complete a degree plan.

With approved credit for the EMT-Basic, credit for the following courses will be granted upon completion of equivalent hours at MCC:

EMSP 1401, Emergency Medical Technician-Basic
EMSP 1160, Clinical-Emergency Medical Technology/Technician

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Intermediate

By passing the National Registry EMT-Intermediate certifying examination, students you may earn college credit. In order to receive credit, the applicant must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Meet all admission requirements of the college.
  2. Present a copy of the National Registry EMT-Intermediate exam scores to the Paramedicine Program Director.
  3. Present a copy of Basic Trauma Life Support-Advanced Certification to the Paramedicine Program Director.
  4. Complete a degree plan.

With approved credit for the EMT-Intermediate, credit for the following courses will be granted upon completion of equivalent hours at MCC:

EMSP 1401, Emergency Medical Technician-Basic
EMSP 1160, Clinical-Emergency Medical Technology/Technician
EMSP 1161, Clinical-Emergency Medical Technology/Technician
EMSP 1162, Clinical-Emergency Medical Technology/Technician
EMSP 1338, Introduction to Advanced Practice
EMSP 1356, Patient Assessment and Airway Management
EMSP 1355, Trauma Management

 

Certified Legal Assistant

By passing the Certified Legal Assistant examination, students may earn college credit. In order to receive credit, the applicant must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Meet all admission requirements of the College.
  2. Present a certified transcript of the CLA Examination results to the Paralegal Program Director.
  3. Complete a degree plan.

With approved credit for the CLA Certification, credit for the following courses will be granted upon completion of equivalent hours at MCC:

LGLA 1313, Introduction to Paralegal Studies
POFT 1227, Introduction to Keyboarding
POFT 1301, Business English
BUSI 2301, Business Law I
ENGL 2311, Technical Communication
PHIL 2374, Critical Thinking
LGLA 1172, Computerized Legal Research
ITSW 1301, Introduction to Word Processing (OFAD elective)
POFT 2321, Machine Transcription (non-LGLA elective)

Students may earn as many as nine more credit hours depending upon the substantive law sections taken on the CLA Examination.

Professional Legal Secretary (PLS)

By passing the Professional Legal Secretary examination, students may earn college credit.

In order to receive credit, the applicant must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Meet all admission requirements of the college.
  2. Present a certified transcript of the PLS Examination results to the Paralegal or Legal Secretary Program Director.
  3. Complete a degree plan.

Paralegal Program

With approved credit for the PLS Certificate, credit for the following courses will be granted upon completion of equivalent hours at MCC:

LGLA 1313, Introduction to Paralegal Studies
POFT 1227, Introduction to Keyboarding
POFT 1301, Business English
BUSI 2301, Business Law I
LGLA 1172, Computerized Legal Research
LGLA 2307, Law Office Management
ITSW 1301, Introduction to Word Processing (OFAD elective)
POFT 2321, Machine Transcription (non-LGLA elective)

Credit for Correspondence Courses

The following conditions apply regarding the acceptance of credit for correspondence courses:

  1. Credit for courses taken by correspondence may be accepted as transfer credit if the courses correspond with courses offered at MCC and if the correspondence courses are completed through a college or university that is accepted by a regional accrediting agency.
  2. In order for correspondence courses to be accepted for transfer or substitutions, these courses must be approved by the Coordinator of Student Admissions and the appropriate division director or program director.
  3. Correspondence courses approved for transfer or as substitutions will apply toward degrees and certificates granted by MCC. All pertinent General Catalog regulations shall apply.

Credit for USAFI Courses

The following conditions apply regarding the acceptance of credit for the United States Armed Forces Institute (USAFI) courses:

  1. Credit for USAFI courses taken by correspondence or through college extension may be accepted as transfer credit if the courses correspond with courses offered at MCC. A course not meeting this criterion may be approved as a substitution for an MCC course by the Coordinator of Student Admissions and the appropriate program director or department coordinator.
  2. USAFI courses for which credit was gained by examination only will not be accepted.
  3. USAFI courses approved for transfer or as substitutions will apply toward degrees and certificates granted by MCC. All pertinent General Catalog regulations shall apply.

Guidelines for Internships

Internship courses are designed to enhance and develop workforce skills in a variety of instructional programs, such as: Accounting, Child Development, Commercial Music, Computer Information Systems, Criminal Justice, Interpreter Training, Paralegal, Management Mental Health, Nursing Home Administration, Office Administration, and Real Estate.

The student should consult with the respective program director for information regarding enrollment in internship courses.

  1. A student enrolling in an internship course must take at least one subject matter course at the same time. Exception: A student who has completed, or will complete in the current semester, all courses listed in that semester of the course of study where the internship is listed may enroll for the internship.
  2. A student must have a declared major in the area in which the internship is done.
  3. A student may not challenge an internship course through credit by examination.
  4. Approved intern stations must provide work experience directly related to the program objective. Students and the intern stations must meet established program guidelines and must be approved by the program director prior to registration.
  5. The minimum acceptable work experience is 20 clock hours and one seminar or conference hour per week for most internship courses. Exceptions must be approved by the Dean of Workforce Education or the Dean of Education & Learning Services.
  6. Other terms for external learning are practicum and clinicals.
  7. Exceptions to the above statement must have prior approval of the Dean of Workforce Education or the Dean of Education & Learning Services.

 

College Grading System

A college grade indicates the level of knowledge, understanding, and competence a student attains in relation to the objectives and subject matter of a course. This level is determined by the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s performance during the semester. A grade is assigned for each course in which a student is enrolled, and that grade is entered on the student’s permanent record. Grade results may be obtained by accessing the MCC Web site at www.mclennan.edu and selecting the WebAdvisor link.

While good grades are important to all students who wish to attain a particular educational objective, they are especially important to students who plan to transfer to senior institutions to complete their education. Only those courses in which satisfactory grades are made can be transferred for credit to other colleges and universities.

The following shall be the system used for reporting and evaluating student grades at McLennan Community College:

 
Grade in Course
Grade Points Per Semester Hour
  A EXCELLENT

4

  B GOOD

3

  C FAIR

2

  D POOR

1

  F FAILING

0

W      WITHDRAWAL — This grade is given for an instructor- or student-initiated course withdrawal through the 60 percent point in the semester or term. After the 60 percent point, an instructor may authorize a course withdrawal and assign either a W if passing work was being accomplished or an F (or NC-Non-completion for a student enrolled in a developmental class) if the student was doing failing work. In extenuating circumstances, the instructor may assign a W to a student who is not passing through the last regular class day of a semester or term.

I      INCOMPLETE — This grade is given when a course is incomplete because of a student’s absence caused by illness or other reasons acceptable to the instructor. To be eligible for this grade, the student must have essentially completed the course. The work remaining should be of such a nature as to not require class attendance. If the work is not made up within the following long semester, the I will be changed to an F and the course must be repeated if credit is to be given.

AU      AUDIT — This grade indicates a course is taken for no credit.

Due to requirements of various accrediting agencies and the nature of clinical education, the grading policies of the health careers programs may differ if approved by the Vice President of Instruction.

Grade points are earned in courses where grades of A, B, C, or D are made. While no (0) grade points are earned for courses in which an F is received, the semester hour value of such courses is included in the total number of semester hours taken. To determine grade point average, total all grade points from all courses in which any of the preceding grades are given and divide the total by the semester hours attempted.

The following grades may be assigned for internships, practicums, special projects, seminars, CLEP examinations, credits by examination, and other courses approved by the Vice President of Instruction:

CR      CREDIT — No grade points are earned. This grade will be given when the student meets the criteria established by the instructor for passing that specific course. Appropriate credit hours are given.

NC      NONCOMPLETION — No grade points are earned. This grade will be given when the student does not complete the criteria for the CR in the special courses listed above nor all of the modules required to complete a self-paced course. The student must re-enroll in the course to receive credit.

Grades in developmental courses will be A, B, C, W, or NC. No grade points are earned for any grade in a developmental course; appropriate developmental credit hours are earned.

Certain Continuing Education programs may use the student grading system of A, B, C, D, F, W, and I. A grade of D or F is not passing, and the student will have to repeat the course for continuing education units (CEUs). No grade points are earned for any grade in a Continuing Education course; appropriate (CEUs) are earned. The selection of Continuing Education programs to use the grading system and any exceptions are made at the discretion of the Continuing Education Dean.

WARNING: It is recommended that students consult the catalog of the four-year college to which they plan to transfer in order to determine the procedure and computations of grades and grade point averages, as colleges differ in their methods of computation. McLennan Community College moved to the four-point system in Fall 1973. Grades earned prior to Fall 1973 are easily converted to the four-point system.

 

Grade Replacement

When courses are repeated, only the credit hours and grade points earned the last time the course was taken are counted toward computing the grade point average. If the course is identified in the catalog as repeatable for credit, all grades are included in the calculation of grade point averages. If a course that is not identified as repeatable for credit in the catalog is repeated, the credit hours for this course will be counted once toward certificate or degree completion. A punitive grade (F) cannot be removed when a student enrolls in that course again and receives a W or I. In this case, the first attempt will continue to be included in the overall grade point average.

 

Grade Appeal Policy

A student may appeal a grade within a period of one year from the day the class ends. Questions regarding potential grade errors should be directed to the Office of Student Records. Grade changes may be made by the instructor of record only, or, in the absence of the instructor, the appropriate Dean. Grade appeals will not be considered after one year.

 


Withdrawal from a Course

Students who are considering withdrawing from a course are to contact one of the following, preferably in the order listed: instructor, advisor, program director, or division director. If, after consultation between the student and the instructor, there is a decision to withdraw through the 60 percent point in the semester or term, it is the responsibility of the student to see that the Change in Schedule Form is filed with the Office of Student Records. If, after the 60 percent point in the semester or term and after consultation between the student instructor, there is a decision to withdraw, it is the responsibility of the instructor to submit the Change in Schedule Form to the Office of Student Records as soon as possible or prior to the last class day of a semester or term. The effective date for withdrawing from a course is the date the Change in Schedule Form is received at the Office of Student Records.

 

Withdrawal from College

In case of emergency where the student must withdraw from the college, the student may request withdrawal by one of the following: 1) advisor or 2) Office of Student Records.

Withdrawal from college requires the return of all college-owned property and payment of all outstanding debts. Official transcripts will be issued only after all obligations to the college have been met.

Students who receive financial assistance should contact the Office of Financial Aid before withdrawing from a class or withdrawing from the college to determine how their financial aid will be affected by the reduction of hours.

 

Scholastic Probation and Suspension

Each student will have his/her scholastic record evaluated at the end of fall and spring semesters. A student taking fewer than 12 semester hours in a regular semester will have his scholastic record evaluated upon the completion of 12 or more semester hours of work.

Any student who has completed one or more semesters and has attempted 12 or more semester hours will be placed on scholastic probation if he/she fails to maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. A student placed on first-time scholastic probation will be strongly encouraged to enroll in PSYC 1300-Learning Framework. A student on scholastic probation will be removed from scholastic probation when he/she earns a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. A student on scholastic probation who achieves a cumulative grade point average of 1.50 through 1.99 will continue on scholastic probation.

Failure of a student on scholastic probation to maintain at least a 1.5 cumulative grade point average will result in his/her being placed on scholastic suspension for one long semester. A student placed on scholastic suspension may waive the long semester of suspension by enrolling in PSYC 1300-Learning Framework. Students who do not attend this required course shall be administratively withdrawn by the Director of Records and Registration from all courses in which they are enrolled. Students who do not improve their grade point average above 1.49 shall be suspended a second time and must stay out for one semester. (Note: Students who have attained a grade point average of 2.5 or higher in their last 12 hours of enrollment may apply to the Director of Records and Registration for special consideration.) Suspension applies to both day and evening classes.

A student who has been suspended from the college for scholastic reasons will be on scholastic probation if he/she re-enters. A student on scholastic probation or suspension who has attempted at least nine hours during the summer terms may, at the end of the summer, be re-evaluated to determine whether the probation or suspension may be rescinded.

Students are expected to know whether they have maintained the minimum standard and are eligible to continue in college. An ineligible student who registers in the college will be subject to dismissal.

 

Access to Student Records

A federal law enacted in 1974, Public Law 93-380 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Acts, grants to all students access to the records that the institution possesses about them.

The law also limits access to a student’s grades, reports of academic performance, reports of disciplinary action, and other data in the personal file without the student’s permission.

As provided in PL 93-380, potential donors and/or donors of scholarships will be provided copies of a student’s record without prior consent from the student or parent (provided the student has made application for the scholarship), and no record thereof will be maintained.

A detailed policy in compliance with this law is published in the Highlander Guide, the student handbook.

 

Directory Information

Directory/general information may be released to the general public without the written consent of the student. A student may request that all or any part of the directory information be withheld from the public by making written request to the Office of Student Admissions or the Office of Student Records during the first 12 class days of a fall or spring semester or the first four class days of a Summer term. This request will apply only to the current enrollment period. The directory information items are listed in the Highlander Guide.

 

Accreditation and Recognition

McLennan Community College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097; telephone number 404-679-4500) to award the Associate in Arts degree, the Associate in Science degree, the Associate of Arts in Teaching degree, the Associate in Applied Science degree, and the Certificate of Completion. Credits from this institution are generally transferable to all colleges and universities in the nation. Persons interested in viewing accreditation documents should contact the Vice President of Instruction.

Recognition has been given McLennan Community College by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The college is approved for the training of veterans and foreign students.

Individual programs also may be accredited or approved by other agencies. The programs that have received such recognition and the accrediting or approving agencies are listed below:

Associate Degree Nursing
Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas
National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission

Certified Nurse Aide
Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services

Certified Medication Aide
Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services

Computer Information Systems
CISCO Local Academy
Novell through Novell’s Education Academic Partners

Continuing Nursing Education
Texas Nursing Association (provider status)

Correctional Officer
Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Cosmetology
Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation

Defensive Driving
Texas Safety Association

Emergency Medical Technology
Department of State Health Services

Electroneurodiagnostics
The Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)

Fire Protection Technology
Texas Commission on Fire Protection

Financial Services
American Institute of Banking Study Group
Texas Credit Union League

Health Information Technology
Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM) in cooperation with the Council on Accreditation of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA)

Law Enforcement Academy
Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education

Long Term Care Administration
Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services

Management/Real Estate
Texas Real Estate Commission

Massage Therapy
Texas Department of Health

Medical Laboratory Technology
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS)

Music
Texas Association of Music Schools

Paramedicine
Department of State Health Services

Physical Therapist Assistant
Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE)

Radiologic Technology
Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)

Respiratory Care Technology
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)

Surgical Technology
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)

Theatre
Texas Educational Theatre Association

Veterinary Technology
The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)

Vocational Nursing
Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas

 

Membership

McLennan Community College is a member of the American Association of Community Colleges, the Texas Community College Association, the Texas Association of Community Colleges, the Texas Junior College Association, the Southern Association of Community Junior Colleges and Tech College, and the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Inc. Departmental memberships are listed below.

Associate Degree Nursing
National League for Nursing

Computer Information Systems
Microsoft MSDN Academic Alliance
Worldwide Organization of Webmasters

Criminal Justice
Community College Criminal Justice Educators of Texas
Texas Peace Officers Association

English
Association of Departments of English
Conference of College Teachers of English in Texas

Music
International Association of Jazz Educators
Music and Entertainment Educators Association
National Association of Music Merchandising
Texas Association of Music Schools
Texas Music Educators Association

Office Technology Careers
American Association for Medical Transcription
National Business Education Association
Office Professionals International

Paralegal
NALS, Association of Legal Professionals
Waco Legal Professionals Association
American Association for Paralegal Educators
Texas Association of Paralegal Educators

Speech Communication
National Communication Association
Texas Speech Communication Association

Theatre
Association for Theatre in Higher Education
Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of the Americas
Southwest Theatre and Film Association
Texas Educational Theatre Association

Visual Arts
Texas Association of Schools of Art

rrtest

this page is used for testing

University Center

The University Center is a partnership between MCC and universities that agree to offer bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral degree programs on the MCC campus. The universities are responsible for their degree programs and provide faculty members to instruct each course. The courses are taught by full-time professors or visiting faculty and are offered in a face-to-face, two-way interactive, or online format. The courses are offered in a predictable sequence so that a student can earn a degree within a designated time period if they follow the proper course sequence and successfully complete each course. While most classes are offered in the evenings and on weekends, day classes are now offered in some degree programs.

Each degree program can be completed by taking classes on the MCC campus or online so that students do not have to commute out of McLennan County. However, students in some University Center programs may choose to take a course at the home university campus in order to finish their degree ahead of schedule.

The University Center at MCC is concerned with the junior- and senior-level courses needed to complete a bachelor’s degree in a chosen field. Graduate programs are also offered in a variety of fields. Advisors are available for each degree that is offered. Each bachelor’s degree plan is designed to incorporate the core curriculum from McLennan Community College to provide a seamless transition to the four-year degree of choice. For the most current list of degrees available and contact information, visit the University Center Web site at uc.mclennan.edu.

Degrees available through the University Center at MCC

University of Texas Arlington (UTA)

Bachelor of Arts in Child Studies with Early Childhood Education to Grade 6
Completion of this degree and successful scores on the TExES Exam will result in Teacher Certification in Texas for grades Early Childhood to sixth grade. After completing the required 82 freshman/sophomore hours, the program allows students to take the remaining 45 UTA junior/senior hours, which include the teaching internship and student teaching, in Waco.

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management
The College of Business Administration (COBA) offers a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree with a concentration in Management taught at the McLennan Community College campus in Waco. The program allows students to finish all UTA credit hours in approximately two years if they take nine credit hours per semester for spring, summer, and fall.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing
The RN to BSN program has been developed for registered nurses who wish to earn a baccalaureate degree in nursing. The program consists of all UTA junior- and senior-level course work brought to Waco. Since this is an “RN” to BSN program, it is accelerated. Work experience may count for clinical experiences; therefore, a student may do the entire junior year in the fall semester and the entire senior year in the spring semester, which allows for completion of the program in one year.

Bachelor of Social Work
The BSW program prepares students to enter the field of professional social work. Graduates work in entry-level positions in a variety of public and private agencies, such as state child and public welfare agencies, mental health and mental retardation centers, medical and psychiatric hospitals, home health organizations, women’s shelters, Planned Parenthood agencies, and senior- and youth-serving organizations. UTA will accept 88 approved freshmen/sophomore college hours for transfer. An additional 36 hours are taught in Waco by UTA to complete the degree requirements.

Master of Business Administration Online
The UTA Online MBA program can be completed at your computer and is fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and AACSB International. This program in General Management provides today’s students with the tools necessary to become leaders in the workplace of tomorrow.

Master of Public Administration
Students wishing to pursue the Master of Public Administration degree with UT Arlington will receive an extensive background of study regarding public management within the urban community. Special emphasis for this non-thesis program is given to leadership capacity, an understanding of the urban environment, and various theories of management and how they relate to handling difficult management issues.

Tarleton State University (TSU)

Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences in Business Occupations
This business degree is attractive to students who complete the MCC Business Management associate degree and/or who have been in the workforce (or applicable military experience) for at least five years. The student can qualify for up to 33 hours of college credit toward this bachelor’s degree for approved occupation specialization experience.

Bachelor of Science in Accounting
For students preparing to become certified public accountants, the Public Accountancy Act of 1991 requires that applicants must have completed at least a baccalaureate degree and not fewer than 150 semester credit hours of recognized courses. Courses included in the Bachelor of Science in Accounting are accepted toward this requirement. This is a 120-hour degree consisting of core curriculum requirements, 24 hours of additional business related courses, and 54 hours of TSU upper-level required accounting and College of Business Administration courses. Courses for this degree option are available in the traditional classroom setting, online, or through two-way interactive methods.

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Services and Development
(Agricultural Extension/Industry Option or Agricultural Science with Teacher Certification Option)

Students are able to complete their core curriculum and additional agriculture courses at MCC in order to transfer directly to Tarleton State University. Those wishing to obtain teacher certification as an agriculture science teacher or who desire to interact in the community in the agricultural industry and extension areas will find these degree options very desirable. Internships are also included to further the student’s course of study.

Bachelor of Science in Applied Science in Business Administration
This business degree has a triple emphasis: a broad-based education through the MCC Core Curriculum; up to 36 semester hours of credit for technical training (work experience not eligible) from most any technical discipline that can be transferred into the program; and a focused development in business knowledge in upper-level courses will be gained. This degree will be valuable if you want to work in a business area related to your academic discipline and technical expertise.

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (Corrections Option or Law Enforcement Option)
Complete two years at MCC in the Criminal Justice program, then transfer directly into one of the Tarleton bachelor’s degree options. Just a few of the career options for well-trained people in this field are police and sheriff’s departments, prisons and correctional facilities, public safety, alcoholic beverage control, parks and wildlife, crime bureaus, juvenile agencies, and investigative departments. On the federal level, criminal justice graduates may work in border patrol, customs, drug enforcement, or immigration and naturalization. There are also countless private opportunities. In many law enforcement positions, the higher the academic degree you hold, the faster you could move up in command positions.

Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with 4-8 Middle School Math/ESL Certifications
Students completing this degree plan and making successful scores on the ExCET/TExES exams will result in Teacher Certification in Texas for 4-8 Middle School Math/ESL. After completing the required freshman/sophomore hours at MCC, the program allows students to take the remaining 48 TSU junior/senior hours, which include the teaching internship and student teaching, in Waco.

Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies
This degree is designed for students who have completed numerous advanced credit hours but have not met the requirements for a major and degree in an academic area. To complete the Liberal Studies degree through the University Center, the student will be expected to designate an emphasis of 18 hours, a support field of nine hours, and an additional 33 elective hours, all at an advanced level. Choices include criminal justice, psychology, business, and sociology. Prospective students must meet with the TSU academic advisor to discuss their previous course work and determine how the courses will meet TSU’s requirements for this degree.

Bachelor of Science in Psychology
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology is intended for students who wish to prepare for work or advanced study in psychology. After completing the required credit hours at MCC, TSU will require an additional 43 hours of upper-level course work. All of the courses will be available either in classrooms at MCC or online.

Master of Business Administration
The Tarleton MBA program is a face-to-face program taught on the MCC campus and will enhance the student’s general business training to prepare them for executive-level positions. Each student’s degree program is designed to provide opportunities for developing leadership and interpersonal and decision-making skills.

Master of Criminal Justice
The 36-hour Master of Criminal Justice (MCJ) offered in Waco is a professional track curriculum designed in consultation with criminal justice professionals. A combination of face-to-face and on-line courses provides an opportunity for students to complete the program and balance full-time employment. The program presents graduates with academic studies coupled with the management and leadership skills necessary to advance in the competitive field of criminal justice.

Master of Education in Counseling
The Master of Education in Counseling is a 48-hour school counselor option that enables graduates to be eligible for the Professional Counselor License (LPC). Students must have accrued at least two years of teaching experience in the public school setting, grades K-12, in order for the school counseling certification to be granted.

Master of Education in Curriculum & Instruction
The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers the Master of Education in Curriculum & Instruction designed to help educators expand their knowledge and skills and to complete certification renewal requirements in their respective fields. The program requires a minimum of 36 hours of coursework designed to provide educators with advanced professional development in pedagogy, subject matter, and/or instructional leadership.

Master of Educational Administration with Principal Certification and Post-Master’s Principal Certification and Superintendent Certification
These degree and certification programs are designed to prepare administrators for a variety of roles and responsibilities at the master’s degree level. The Principal’s Certificate qualifies one to hold campus-level administrative positions in the school, including the principalship. After successfully completing the M.Ed. degree in Educational Administration, a student is then eligible to make application for the TSU doctoral program (Ed.D.) in educational leadership. Many students, after successfully completing a Principal Certification Program will opt to continue on to the Superintendency Certification Program. This is an additional 15 hours, 12 of which will satisfy the doctoral program requirement.

Master of Science in Counseling Psychology
The Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology allows students to obtain the Licensed Professional Counselor designation. Students pursuing this 48-hour degree will be provided options in counseling psychology and marriage and family. Curriculum includes career counseling and guidance, psychopathology, group therapy, and human development.

Master of Science, Human Resource Management
This is a 36-hour degree in Human Resource Management that will provide the student with a background in the major functional areas of human resource management. The program will increase students’ knowledge, skills, as well as abilities in the field, and the capacity to advance in the profession.

Master of Science, Information Systems
The Master of Science in Information Systems degree is designed to develop a student’s skills as an information systems professional. Those pursuing this degree will complete a comprehensive 36-hour program that includes course work relating to telecommunications, systems analysis, database management, and research methods in information systems. Upon completion of the course work, a comprehensive exam must be satisfactorily completed. This degree is totally online.

Master of Science, Management
This degree is a 36-hour program designed for students aspiring to, or continuing in, general management and leadership roles in for-profit and not-for-profit businesses. The major focuses are leadership and change. This degree is especially attractive to managers already working in the field or those seeking management positions, wanting to facilitate a change of careers, or to advance in a current position.

Texas Tech University

Bachelor of General Studies
The Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) is a unique program for students who wish to study multiple fields in equivalent depth. Instead of a major and minor, the student selects three concentration areas in consultation with the B.G.S. advisor. Together, the three concentration areas formulate a coherent specialization that is unavailable elsewhere in the university as an organized program of study. Each concentration consists of a minimum of 18 hours in the chosen area for a total of 54 hours across the three areas. Through these self-selected concentration areas, forming an integrated specialization, the B.G.S. degree can prepare a student to pursue graduate or professional study, an intellectual interest, or a career goal.

The University of Texas Medical Branch/Galveston

Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science
This program allows for MCC graduates with an Associate of Applied Science in Medical Laboratory Technology to transfer their credits directly into the UTMB Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science program

The University of Texas at Brownsville

Bachelor of Applied Technology (BAT) in Computer Information System Technology (CIST)
The BAT CIST track prepares individuals for employment in industry, business, banking, and other services or fields where computer-related knowledge, competencies, and skills are essential. The student will complete the core curriculum plus up to an additional 35 credit hours in a related technical field at MCC. The UTB BAT CIST will then require an additional 36-37 upper-level credit hours from UTB, which are totally online.

Bachelor of Applied Technology (BAT) in Health Services Technology (HST)
The BAT HST track is designed for individuals who would like a bachelor’s degree and continued training in the allied health technical areas. It prepares the student for careers in mid-management in health service and health corporate settings with responsibilities in management and extensive supervision and for instructional responsibilities in health services training, and other related fields. The student will complete the core curriculum and up to 36 credit hours in a related technical field at MCC. The UTB BAT HST will then require an additional 36 upper-level credit hours from UTB, which are totally online.

Midwestern State University (MSU)

Bachelor of Science RRT to BSRC
Students who have completed their respiratory care technology training with MCC now have the option to complete a Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Care through the University Center. Once a student has completed the RRT examination administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care, they may submit credentialing verifications to Midwestern State University, complete their core curriculum at MCC, and then finish 32 upper-level hours with MSU in order to complete their BSRC. All courses for this degree are taught either on the MCC campus or online.

 

Additional Options Offered through the University Center in cooperation with Texas State Technical College (TSTC) and Tarleton State University (TSU)

Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Agriculture Specialization, Horticulture (AH BAAS AOC)
This degree is a unique arrangement that it is very appealing to students who have completed specialized training within the TSTC Horticultural program. Core classes can be taken at MCC to complete basic requirements, and the occupational specialization is to be completed at TSTC. The student will then transfer to Tarleton State University to complete major requirements, which include but are not limited to horticultural design, plant propagation, and greenhouse crop production. Upper-level courses will be completed at Tarleton State University.

Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Agriculture Specialization, Horticulture Golf Course Management (AH BAAS AOC)
Another variety to the BAAS Agriculture Specialization, Horticulture degree is one that focuses specifically on Golf Course Management. It, too, allows the student to complete core requirements with MCC and to obtain the occupational specialization requirements through the TSTC Horticultural program. The focus on this particular degree adds turf grass management and landscape design courses, as well as training for weed control and more. Upper-level courses will be completed at Tarleton State University.

Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Industrial Occupations Specialization Engineering Technology
This degree, which has a focus on engineering technology, will be appealing to students who have completed an A.A.S. degree program from computer graphics, engineering technologies, or transportation and services clusters. It allows the student the opportunity to take advantage of up to 48 hours of occupational specialization for such previous training. The core classes may be completed at MCC, along with the major requirement courses being taught online.

Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership
This Ed.D. program from Tarleton State University is designed to prepare highly qualified scholar-practitioners for public school leadership. The Ed.D. in Educational Leadership offers a rich theoretical knowledge base as the foundation for the development of visionary leaders for the Pk-12 environment. The degree combines an individualized program of study with specialized course work and research. This degree is not delivered entirely in Waco. Classes rotate between Stephenville, Waco and Fort Worth.

Conference Center

MCC offers this state-of-the-art facility for banquets, conferences, lectures, receptions, seminars, teleconferences, and workshops. It’s conveniently located in the Community Services Center right off of North 19th Street. Several floor plans are available to accommodate groups of a dozen to 500. Each room has individual climate control, sound, and lighting panels as well as audio-visual equipment for impressive presentations. Catering options are also available. For more information, call (254) 299-8586.

Retired Senior and Volunteer Program (RSVP)

RSVP coordinates volunteers over the age of 55 and the non-profit organizations in which they serve throughout a six-county area. While MCC is the primary sponsor of the program, it is funded through local, state, and federal grants from such sources as the Cooper and Waco Foundations, the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, and the Corporation for National and Community Service. For more information, contact the RSVP office at (254) 299-8577.